Clean Water
Facility Project

Past Construction Updates

11/30/2018 - Project partners party with us at the Ribbon Cutting celebration!

Pressing the button to change flows to Oak Harbor Bay and image of CUtting the ribbon at the new Clean Water Facility

Yesterday, Thursday, November 29, was our Ribbon Cutting event to celebrate completion of the new Clean Water Facility. During the event we not only cut an appropriately colored blue and yellow ribbon, but took the final step to make the facility fully operational by directing effluent flows out to Oak Harbor Bay (learn more about effluent from our Nov. 15 update). The new facility is so state-of-the-art that all we had to do was press a button on a tablet, no wrench required!

Thank you to everyone who joined us to help celebrate, including City Councilmembers, City staff, our Clean Water Facility operators, the project team, project partners, and members of the community. Speakers at the event included Mayor Bob Severns, Senator Barbara Bailey, 10th District representative Norma Smith and representatives from our project partners including the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Puget Sound Partnership.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that the Puget Sound is the largest estuary in the United States? It’s home to over 3,000 species of invertebrates (e.g. geoduck clams, oysters, octopuses, sea urchins), 200 species of marine fish (e.g. salmon, steelhead, herring) and hundreds of other species of sea birds, shorebirds, and waterfowl. Since the water in Oak Harbor Bay flows into the Puget Sound, we have a responsibility to keep the City of Oak Harbor’s wastewater clean. The good news is, with the new Clean Water Facility up and running, we’re up to the task!

Anticipated work November 30 - December 5:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Operators are monitoring flows from the city 24/7.
  • Final work on building exteriors continues.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation continues on the east and west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Play boulder and ship wreck construction in the splash park continues.
  • Construction of the pavilion continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.
  • Planting continues.

11/21/2018 – Happy Thanksgiving!

Pouring cement for walkways in Windjammer Park and image of the sun setting on the administration building

The facility is operational and will continue to run throughout the Thanksgiving holiday with the help of our operators. Construction in the park will be taking a break, however, and starting up again next week. This year we have a lot to be thankful for, including how far we’ve come on the Clean Water Facility. Effluent testing is going well and the results are very positive (learn more about effluent from our Nov. 15 update). New park elements are also taking shape as we continue to work on the splash park, east and west kitchens, and the gateway pavilion.

November 29th Celebration

Following the holiday, we will celebrate the completion of the Clean Water Facility. This event is an opportunity to welcome the Clean Water Facility to Windjammer Park. The ribbon-cutting ceremony will begin at 1:30 p.m. on November 29. For more details, visit oakharborcleanwater.org.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that Benjamin Franklin favored the turkey? In a letter to his daughter he compared the character of the turkey to the bald eagle. Of the turkey he wrote, “the Turkey is in comparison a much more respectable bird, and withal a true original native of America… He is besides, though a little vain and silly, a bird of courage.” We think bald eagles and turkeys are both great, but we’re especially excited to enjoy some Turkey this Thursday.

Anticipated work November 21 - November 28:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Continue treating flows from the city and perform final testing.
  • No construction will occur Thursday, November 22, through Sunday, November 25, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. The facility is operational and will be running throughout the weekend.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation continues on the east and west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Play boulder and ship wreck construction in the splash park continues.
  • Construction of the pavilion continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.
  • Planting continues.

11/15/2018 – Whistling while we work!

Testing effluent from the clean water facility and image of spalsh park boulders and play area taking shape

Clean Water Facility

The Clean Water Facility has been up and running for over a week and we’re finding our groove! Final tests are continuing and cleaned water from the facility is still headed to our Lagoon Facility on Seaplane Base. We’re taking the time to make sure all equipment and computers are working correctly before taking the final step to send cleaned water out to Oak Harbor Bay.

Windjammer Park Improvements

Work continues on new Windjammer Park elements including the splash park, east and west kitchens and gateway pavilion. Crews are pouring cement to form walkways, parking areas and other elements and we’re really starting to get a sense of what the new Windjammer Park will look like when complete. Check out our November 1 update for more information on each of the elements we’re working on.

Celebrate with us on November 29

There’s only two weeks until we celebrate the new Clean Water Facility. This is a huge milestone for the project and an opportunity to welcome the Clean Water Facility to Windjammer Park. Join us for the ribbon cutting ceremony at 1:30 p.m. on November 29. For more details, take a look at our save-the-date invitation.

Fun fact of the week

When hearing our facility operators talk about the water released into Oak Harbor Bay, you will likely hear the term “effluent.” Effluent is defined as treated water that is released into a natural body of water. Wastewater treatment is important to the health of our environment. It protects us, and the plants and animals that live in the water, from harmful bacteria.

Anticipated work November 15 - November 21:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Continue treating flows from the city and perform final testing.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, November 17, during normal working hours.
  • No work will occur Thursday, November 22, through Sunday, November 25, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation continues on the east and west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Play boulder and ship wreck construction in the splash park continues.
  • Construction of the pavilion continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.
  • Planting continues.

11/09/2018 – We're up and running!

Crews watching the fine screens during operation Flipping the switch to re-energize the facility to begin operations

On Monday, our new Clean Water Facility began processing sewer flows. Our project team and crews have been working on start-up and testing for the past few weeks to ensure the facility was ready for this big step. For now, the cleaned water from the facility is going to our Lagoon Facility located on Seaplane Base. This is the final step in testing to make sure everything is working as it should. Once final tests are performed, the cleaned water will go out to Oak Harbor Bay. When you flush your toilet, take a shower, or wash your dishes, that drained water will be treated by your new facility!

Celebrate with us on November 29

Completing construction and starting up the facility is a huge milestone and cause for celebration. Join us at the new facility on Thursday, November 29 at 1:30 p.m. for our ribbon cutting ceremony. See the attached save-the-date invitation for more details.

Fun fact of the week

This week, new residents moved into the facility as we started treating flows. We welcomed microorganisms to our aeration basins! Once waste hits these aeration basins, microorganisms chow down on the waste to help get rid of it. This process mimics what happens with waste in nature, just at an accelerated rate. Why change something that nature already does well?

Anticipated work November 9 - November 14:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Continue treating flows from the city and perform final testing.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, November 10, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation continues on the east and west kitchen
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park
  • Play boulder construction in the splash park continues and work begins on the ship wreck
  • Construction of the pavilion continues
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues
  • Planting continues

11/01/2018 – Windjammer Park improvements taking shape!

Crews carving play boulders at the splash park with the Clean Water Facility administration building in the background Planting natural drainage area in the northwest corder of Windjammer Park

Over the past few months crews have been working on improvements to Windjammer Park. The work began with shallow excavation, moving dirt, and grading. Lately, crews have been busy working on structures, plantings, pathways, and parking lots. Below, you can read more about our progress on park structures and learn how they have been thoughtfully designed for the climate.

Splash Park

Work is progressing nicely on the play boulders and logs in the splash park. Next up will be building the ship wreck, which will be a central part of the splash park. It has also been designed for play when the splash park is turned off, making it fun in all seasons.

East and West Kitchens

With foundations poured, work this week has turned to building walls. The new kitchens will include covered seating and food preparation areas, including countertops and sinks. Both kitchens will provide shade from the sun and shelter from the rain, so you can celebrate with a view throughout the year.

Gateway Pavilion

Every great park needs an iconic entrance, and the pavilion is ours. The pavilion will serve as a concert stage or just a nice covered place to sit and enjoy the views. It will continue to take shape in the coming weeks as the roof is built.

Fun fact of the week

Pavilion comes from the Old French pavillon, which means a large decorated tent. Let’s take it a step further: pavillon comes from the Latin, papilio, which translates to butterfly. Maybe one of the future events in Windjammer Park will turn our new pavilion into a butterfly decorated tent or if we’re being fancy, a papilio pavillon!

Anticipated work November 1 - November 7:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Starting next week our facility will start processing flows from the City! Stay tuned for our update next Thursday to learn more.
  • City operators are testing equipment around the facility.
  • Start-up activities and commissioning continue across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, November 3, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation continues on the east and west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Play boulder construction in the splash park continues and work begins on the ship wreck.
  • Construction of the pavilion continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.
  • Planting continues.

10/25/2018 – Operators are in control

Operators training session for one of the facility's course screens in the Headworks building

Over the past couple months, our new Clean Water Facility operators have been training with field technicians from the various companies that supplied our equipment. As equipment testing has taken place, our operators have learned the ropes and are now in control of facility operations and working on final testing. We are excited and proud to have 8 full-time, highly qualified, and well-trained operators at the helm of our new Clean Water Facility. If you get the chance to meet our operators, ask them for their best story and say thank you. You’ll have a whole new appreciation for the highly technical, and thorough, job they do to keep our system running so we can flush our toilets without a second thought.

Fun fact of the week

Coarse screens are the Clean Water Facility’s first line of defense. These screens will remove heavy material and large items that have made it through the city’s network of pipes into the facility. Heavy material includes “flushable” wipes. These wipes are not actually flushable, they don’t breakdown and can get caught in our system’s pumps and pipes, causing damage. Toilet paper is designed to dissolve, flushable wipes aren’t and we have to remove them from the system. We also see a lot of pennies and small toys. While we sometimes get a good chuckle, please pay attention to what you flush and only send toilet paper down the toilet.

Anticipated work October 25 – October 31:

Clean Water Facility work

  • City operators are testing equipment around the facility.
  • Start-up activities and commissioning continue across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, October 27, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Masonry wall installation on the east and west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Play boulder construction in the splash park continues.
  • Construction of the pavilion continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.

10/18/2018 – Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3

Play boulders and logs for the new splash park Membrane cassette testing using potable water

With most of the work on the exterior of the Clean Water Facility complete, crews are moving inside to start testing the facility’s new state-of-the-art equipment. Equipment throughout the plant is tested first with clean, also called potable, water. The membrane cassettes that will help remove microscopic solids from the flow coming into the facility are currently being tested.

Continuing work on splash park

Crews are continuing to work on the splash park, including work on the boulders and the area that will become the river feature. Want to know what they will look like? Check out the photo below of the future play rocks and logs that will serve as key features of the splash park.

Fun fact of the week

Potable water, like the water we use during testing, is water that is safe to drink or to use for food preparation. The word potable comes from the Latin word potare, meaning to drink. Here’s a tip to help during your travels, the word potable is the same in French. You’ll always know how to ask if water is safe to drink while you’re in Paris!

Anticipated work October 18 – October 24:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Grading at the site of the former Whidbey Island Bank building.
  • Electrical wiring continues in solids building.
  • City operators are testing equipment around the facility.
  • Start-up activities and commissioning continue across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, October 20, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Construction of the west kitchen continues.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Work on the splash park continues.
  • Work on curbs and sidewalks continues.
  • Paving finishes on the west parking area and basketball/pickleball courts.

10/11/2018 – Whidbey Island Bank Building

View from Pioneer Way before and after removal of Whidbey Island Bank building

This week crews will complete demolition of the Whidbey Island Bank building, opening up views to the water from Pioneer Way. The area will provide public parking, as part of the plans for the new Clean Water Facility and Windjammer Park improvements. Next summer, visitors will be able to park in the new lot and take the scenic walkway to the splash park or the Clean Water Facility’s interpretive center.

New west kitchen gets walls

Crews have completed pouring the base slab for the new west kitchen and are starting work on the walls. The west and east kitchens have both been designed for our Oak Harbor climate. They are positioned in locations that provide the best shelter from the wind, while still taking advantage of the park’s beautiful views.

Fun fact of the week

In 1810, canned food was invented by Frenchman Nicholas Appert using glass jars with lids. Later that year, Peter Durand received a patent from King George III for the world’s fist can made of iron and tin. Unfortunately, it would be another 45 years before anyone invented a can opener. Until the 1860s, canned food would come with instructions to “cut round the top near the outer edge with a chisel and hammer.” Thank goodness we’ve come so far and now have easy open cans for making your fruit punch in our new kitchens!

Anticipated work October 11 – October 17:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Structure removal finishes on Whidbey Island Bank building.
  • Electrical wiring continues in solids building (#5).
  • Start up activities and commissioning continue across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, October 13, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Wall installation continues on the west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Boulder installation continues in the splash park.
  • Paving on the west parking area and basketball/pickleball courts.

10/05/2018 – It's been a busy week

Boulder installation at new splash park in Windjammer Park

Over the past week crews have started to take down the Whidbey Island Bank Building, install pipes under Pioneer Way to bring flows into the new facility, and begun testing the facility’s state-of-the-art equipment. The removal of the Whidbey Island Bank Building will open up new views of the water and create space for parking and a park promenade. Pioneer Way is expected to reopen to traffic today.

Splash Park boulder installation

As part of the Windjammer Park Improvements, crews have been working on the splash park. This week, installation of boulders that will form some of the play elements continues. Check out this week’s photo and picture water flowing around the boulders. Imagine the fun coming to the park summer 2019!

Congratulations Miles Sand & Gravel

Every year the Washington Aggregates & Concrete Association recognizes projects that have shown outstanding use of Ready Mix Concrete in Washington State. This year the Clean Water Facility team won the award! Congratulations to our whole team and to our local contractor, Miles Sand & Gravel, who provided the concrete mix.

Fun fact of the week

Those rocks in the new splash park look cool, but what makes a boulder a boulder? We’re glad you asked. Technically, a boulder is any rock fragment that is bigger than 10.1 inches in diameter. In generic terms, and how most folks use the word, a boulder is a rock that is too big for a person to move. Our new splash park boulders definitely fall into the latter category.

Anticipated work October 4 – October 10:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Electrical wiring continues in the odor control area (#7).
  • Start up tests happening across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, October 6, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Structure removal continues on the Whidbey Island Bank building.
  • Wall installation continues for the west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Construction continues on the splash park boulders.

9/27/2018 – Separating Solids

Installing membrane cartridges in the secondary treatment building

Earlier this week crews completed the installation of the membrane cartridges in the membrane bioreactor tanks, located in the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). These cartridges will separate microscopic solids from liquids during the treatment process. The membrane’s pores in the cartridges are thinner than a human hair!

Roadwork on SE City Beach St in October

The week of October 1st, crews will be working in the road at SE City Beach St and SE Bayshore Dr. This work is necessary to divert sewage to the new treatment facility. During this work, the right turn lane on SE City Beach St will be closed for approximately 48 hours. Traffic will be detoured from SE City Beach St to SE Pioneer Way and access to SE Bayshore Dr will be available via SE Dock St.

Fun fact of the week

The fall equinox came and went on September 22, and we’re feeling the shorter days and colder nights. Did you know that on the equinox, sunrise and sunset are separated by exactly 12 hours all over the world? In fact the word “equinox” is derived from the Latin word “equinoxium,” meaning equality between night and day.

Anticipated work September 27 – October 3:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Installation of a monorail system including a trolley and hoist installation continues in the headworks and solids buildings (#1 and 5).
  • Electrical wiring continues in the odor control area (#7).
  • Start up tests continue across the facility.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, September 29, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Structure removal continues on the Whidbey Island Bank building.
  • Wall installation continues for the west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Curb and sidewalk installation continue throughout the park.
  • Construction continues on the splash park boulders.

9/20/2018 – Windjammer Park structure removals starting Friday

Check out progress in Windjammer Park

This week, the City is saying a fond farewell to the aging windmill. In 2017, an inspection revealed the original untreated wood used to build the windmill in the 1970s had deteriorated due to the marine climate in Oak Harbor. The community plan is to replace the windmill in a more visible spot for residents and visitors to enjoy. Once a new location is identified using community input, the City’s goal is to use the original windmill plans from the Netherlands as a basis to rebuild the windmill to modern standards, celebrating Oak Harbor’s Dutch heritage. Crews will also remove the west bathrooms this week.

Removal of the Whidbey Island Bank building is scheduled to begin next week once staff have finished relocating to the new state-of-the-art administration building. Once removed, the space will be used for additional parking and to make room for a new promenade. The removal of the bank building will open up views of Oak Harbor Bay from Pioneer Way to the water.

Roadwork on SE City Beach St in October

Starting in October, crews will be working in the road at SE City Beach St and SE Bayshore Dr. This work is necessary to divert sewage to the new treatment facility. During this work, the right turn lane on SE City Beach St will be closed for approximately 48 hours. Traffic will be detoured from SE City Beach St to SE Pioneer Way and access to SE Bayshore Dr will be available via SE Dock St.

Fun fact of the week

We’re excited about moving to our new offices! Did you know that Fridays are the most popular day to move? Additionally, over half the people who move in the U.S. choose to move between May and September. As we move to the administration building this beautiful September Friday, we’re lifting with our legs and not our backs!

Anticipated work September 20 – September 26:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Installation of a monorail system including a trolley and hoist installation continues in the headworks and solids buildings (#1 and 5).
  • Preparation to install cartridges in the membrane tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).

Windjammer Park Improvement work

  • Structure removal begins on the windmill and west bathrooms.
  • Temporary trail construction continues along the park’s south boundary.
  • Wall installation begins for the west kitchen.
  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Curb and sidewalk installation continues throughout the park.
  • Construction continues on Splash Park boulders.

9/13/2018 – Odors be gone

Installing odor control bags in the odor control area (#7)

This week crews are loading odor control material made of a special type of perlite, also used in potting soil, and sawdust into large bags that will be placed in the odor control area (#7 on the map above). Once in place these bags will become the first step in our two-step air cleaning process. First the odor control material will capture smelly air pumped from other Clean Water Facility buildings and scrub away odors using a biological process. Next, our carbon vessels will catch any odors left in the air for a final cleaning. For more information our carbon vessels see our archived updates.

Waterfront trail detours

Please pay attention to signs posted along the Waterfront Trail in the coming weeks as temporary detours are being set-up to accommodate construction in the SW corner of Windjammer Park. Detours will be clearly marked with signs and gravel be placed where the trail detours from the main asphalt path. As construction on Windjammer Park continues please expect to see more temporary detours.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that every time you put food in your mouth thousands of biological reactions are taking place? Just as the odor control material we use at the Clean Water Facility uses a biological reaction to break down and remove odors from the air, the enzymes in our bodies react with the food we eat to break it down into nutrients our bodies can absorb.

Anticipated work September 13 – September 19:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Installation of a monorail system including a trolley and hoist installation continues in the headworks building and solids building (#1 and 5).
  • Preparing to install cartridges in the membrane tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Signage installation continues inside the administration building (#11).

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Curb and sidewalk installation begins throughout the park.
  • Construction begins on Splash Park boulders.

9/6/2018 – Biosolids dryer update

Installing the biosolids dryer in the solids building (#5)

Crews are getting close to completing set-up of the Clean Water Facility’s biosolids dryer machine, the main piece of equipment in the solids building (#5 on the map above). Our dryer machine comes all the way to Oak Harbor from Germany and is the first of its kind to be installed in the United States. Once operational the biosolids dryer will act a lot like your household furnace, heating up and drying biosolids by sending air through a system of pipes. We anticipate that our machine will be able to dry enough material each week to fill a twenty-yard dumpster or the equivalent of six pick-up trucks!

Fun fact of the week

The very first steam-heating system was invented by Angier March Perkins in the 1830s. The system was installed in England in the home of Governor of the Bank of England, John Horley Palmer. Instead of heating his home, the Governor used his heating system to grow grapes in England’s cold climate.

Anticipated work September 6 – September 12:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Installation of a monorail system including a trolley and hoist installation continues in the headworks building and solids building (#1 and 5).
  • Preparing to install cartridges in the membrane tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Signage installation begins at the administration building (#11).

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • Irrigation pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Due to region-wide strike of operating engineers some park work is currently on hold.

8/23/2018 – More about SCADA

Example of SCADA system screen

Last week we introduced you to our Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition, or SCADA, system that will be used to monitor and control the facility’s functions. With all the electrical wires installed, testing on the system is beginning this week. The SCADA system will have four servers interconnected by a fiber optics network which communicates with over 20 Programable Logic Controllers, or PLCs. PLCs are industrial computers that work very fast, are highly reliable, and allow for a single-operator shift per day.

Fun fact of the week

Copper is the oldest metal to be used in making wires, starting with the invention of the electromagnet and the telegraph in the 1820s. We’re using 110 miles of #10 insulated copper wire in the facility for a variety of electrical purposes. That’s about the distance from Windjammer Park to Stanley Park in Vancouver, BC.

Anticipated work August 23 – August 29:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Paneling installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Cartridge installation begins on the membrane bioreactor in the secondary treatment building (#3)
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Signage installation begins at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 25, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site paving work continues throughout the park.
  • Utility installation begins for the west kitchen.
  • Due to region-wide strike of operating engineers some park work is currently on hold.

8/16/2018 – Getting Connected

Connecting wires in the electrical building(#9)

Over the past several months our construction crews have been working to install electrical wires around the Clean Water Facility site to connect the facility to our Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition, or SCADA system, housed in the administration building (#11 on the map above). The SCADA system is connected to the day-to-day operations of the facility by 3,000 individual points, which monitor facility equipment. If a problem occurs at any of these points, the SCADA system will notify our staff immediately, so they can respond to the problem. Overall, the SCADA system makes our Clean Water Facility efficient, safer, and more reliable.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that the outside coating of electrical wires is color coded? In the United States, green coating means the wire is connected to the ground, white coating means it’s connected to a circuit or electrical panel, and black, blue, red, brown, yellow, and orange all mean the wire is carrying a high-voltage electrical current. The next time you’re looking at wires, pay attention to the colors! Please also treat all electrical wires as dangerous.

Anticipated work August 17 – August 22:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Paneling installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Signage installation begins at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 18, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • On-site paving work continues throughout the park.
  • Utility installation begins for the west kitchen.

8/9/2018 – Clean water facility paving

Paving the clean water facility courtyard

This week crews are working on paving the courtyard for the clean water facility. To make sure the pavement is strong and can provide adequate structural support after construction, crews follow a series of steps. First, they make sure the soil is compact so that it doesn’t erode and cause cracks or deformations in the pavement. Then they set gravel on top of the soil to help shape the courtyard. The final step is to set the pavement.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that asphalt, one type of pavement, is the leading recycled product in the U.S.? Eighty percent of black material in asphalt is recycled, which adds up to nearly 73 million tons annually. That’s nearly twice the amount of paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic recycled every year!

Anticipated work August 10 – August 15:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 11, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • On-site paving work continues throughout the park.
  • Utility installation begins for the west kitchen.

8/2/2018 – Now we're cooking!

Preparing sites for the East Kitchen and Pavilion

This week we are preparing the East Kitchen and Pavilion sites for construction! Last week, City Council approved these elements for inclusion in Phase 1 park improvements. When complete these elements will be valuable multi-purpose spaces where residents can connect with neighbors and find shelter from the weather.

Community drop-in update

Our last community drop-in opportunity will be this Monday, August 6 from 2-4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building. After next week, we will be answering community questions in person by appointment or over the phone. Please call 360-914-7000 if you have a question or would like to schedule an appointment.

Fun fact of the week

The word pavilion comes from the French pavillon, or Old French paveilun, which means a “decorated tent.” Tents have been used for protection from weather and places to come together in community for thousands of years. In fact, the first tent ruins were found in Russia and date back to around the year 40,000 BC. While modern tents are made from lighter and more technical materials, these early tents were made mainly from mammoth hides. We look forward to the future sun- and wind-protecting pavilion at Windjammer Park!

Anticipated work August 3 – August 8:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Paneling installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Fan installation continues in the odor control area (#7).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 4, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • On-site paving work continues throughout the park.

7/26/2018 – Water pipe installation

Installing pipes in Windjammer Park

This week crews are continuing to install pipelines in Windjammer Park which will upgrade a section of the city water system which is need of replacement. These pipes will provide water service to the Clean Water Facility in addition to providing water to new park elements like the splash park and the east kitchen. The water system in Oak Harbor consists of over 90 miles of pipe delivering water for domestic and fire use throughout the city.

Fun fact of the week

July is one of the hotter months in Oak Harbor, with temperatures averaging 67 degrees Fahrenheit. That temperature might sound cool compared to the temperatures this week which have been in the low to mid-70s. When the Clean Water Facility is complete, temperature will be a very important factor in the wastewater treatment process. In fact, hot air will be used in the solids building (#5 on the map above) to convert leftover solid waste into useful fertilizer to use on golf courses, farms, community gardens, and more!

Anticipated work July 27 – August 1:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Window installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Paneling installation continues at the secondary treatment building and solids building (#3 and 5).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Fan installation continues in the odor control area (#7).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 28, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • On-site paving work continues throughout the park.

7/19/2018 – New paneling

Fiberglass reinforced panels installed on the administration building(#11)

Did you know that the clean water facility is designed for the marine environment in the City of Oak Harbor? A crucial piece of this design is the paneling our crews are installing on buildings throughout the site. The panels are made from a special fiberglass reinforced concrete, designed to look like a wood panel and hold up better to the harsh marine winds coming off the harbor. Next time you walk the Waterfront trail look for the dark and light gray panels already installed on the administration building (#11 on the map above).

Fun fact of the week

Reinforced concrete is the only building material today that is highly resistant to both water and fire, making it a perfect material for protecting buildings. The Romans were the first to make reinforced concrete with a special mixture of volcanic ash, seawater, and lime. Researchers have shown that with the right combination of these materials, the Romans were able to create a chemical reaction that increased the strength of their concrete with exposure to seawater. Although the exact recipe for Roman concrete has been lost with time, the piers they built with this special mixture still exist over 2,000 years later.

Anticipated work July 20 – July 25:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Window installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Fan installation continues in the odor control area (#7).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 21, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • On-site paving work begins throughout the park.

07/12/2018 – Administration building interior update!

Lockers installed in the administration building (#11)

At the end of May we wrote about the interior of the administration building (#11 on the map above) coming together. Since then we’ve installed almost all the building’s bathroom fixtures and lockers and flipped on the electricity to the building. Now crews are working on more fixtures: for example, installing mirrors in bathrooms and flooring throughout the building. Work on the interior of the administration building is expected to be complete in early August.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that the word toilet has evolved significantly from its French origin? The word toilet was originally derived from the French word toile, meaning “cloth.” In French a small piece of cloth is referred to as toilette which was adopted in the 16th century by English speakers. Over time the spelling of the word changed, and the meaning evolved. Then in the 18th-century the word toilet began to refer to the room where grooming and washing is done. When the fixture was invented in the 1700s the word toilet transferred from the room to the fixture itself.

Anticipated work July 13 – July 18:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Window installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Fan installation begins in the odor control area (#7).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 14, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues throughout the park.
  • Work to level areas for new Windjammer Park elements continues.

7/5/2018 – Moving soil into Windjammer Park!

Catepillar D8 dozer at work spreading soil in Windjammer Parm

We are proud to announce that Mt. Windjammer has quickly disappeared! If you can remember all the way back at the beginning of the Clean Water Facility project, you might recall the digging and soil removal we had to do. We’ve been storing this soil on-site, waiting to put it back into the park. Now that we are working on new park elements, we’ve been able to move most of this massive dirt pile into the new park element areas for construction. Helping us complete this work is a crucial piece of equipment named the Caterpillar or “Cat” D8 dozer. Standing 12 feet tall and weighing almost 87,000 pounds, this piece of equipment is perfect for spreading and leveling soil. Keep an eye out for this hard worker the next time you’re walking the Waterfront Trail!

Keep track of upcoming work on park improvements by looking at our “Windjammer Park Improvements work” section below.

Fun fact of the week

Caterpillar, or Cat, is a popular brand of construction equipment. The brand’s trademark is the continuous belt tracks at the base of many of their machines that allow them to easily move over soft soil. While inventor Benjamin Holt was refining the design of these tracks in the early 1900s, a company photographer commented that the equipment moved like a caterpillar. The name stuck and eventually became the company’s trademark.

Anticipated work July 6 – July 11:

Clean Water Facility work

  • Window installation continues in the secondary treatment buildings (#1).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks building (#3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Installation of fixtures in the administration building continues (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 7, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements work

  • On-site pipe installation continues.
  • Work to level areas for new Windjammer Park elements continues.

6/28/2018 – Happy Fourth of July!

Fire water pipe installation

Enjoy celebrating the holiday with your neighbors in historic downtown. For more information on Oak Harbor’s old fashioned 4th of July, visit the city’s website.

Fire safety

Our crews have been installing new fire water pipelines near the administration, electrical and aeration blower buildings (#8, 9 and 11 on the map above), as well as in Windjammer Park. In case of a fire, these new pipes will quickly carry three to six hundred gallons of water per minute to put out a fire.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that the color of a fire hydrant can mean different things? The most common colors for hydrants are bright shades of red and yellow, to make them easily visible in the case of an emergency. In some places, the tops of fire hydrants are painted a different color to let fire fighters know how many gallons per minute, or GPM, a hydrant is able to deliver. The higher GPM hydrants are usually painted blue on top and the lowest GPM hydrants are usually painted red on top. In Oak Harbor some fire hydrants are also decorated by local artists, including some high school students.

Anticipated work June 29 – July 4:

Clean Water Facility

  • Electrical wiring and window installation continues at the headworks and secondary treatment buildings (#1 and 3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Bathroom locker installation continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Water line installation continues around the site.
  • Crews will not work on the 4th of July; work will occur on Saturday, July 7, during normal working hours.

Windjammer Park Improvements

  • Water line installation continues around the site.
  • Leveling and grading soil to prepare work areas.

6/21/2018 – Testing begins!

PD pump in the secondary building (#3)

If you’ve been following our weekly updates, you know that we turned on the power last week to the electrical building (#9 in the map above) so we could begin testing equipment. This week we began testing two pumps in the secondary treatment building (#3). These pumps, known as Plant Drain or “PD” Pumps, can move 600-700 gallons of water per minute! They are also located in the lowest part of the facility so we can use them to can keep water moving through our system.

PSE work on SE Pioneer Way

Next week and after the July Fourth holiday Puget Sound Energy (PSE) will be working on SE Pioneer Way to bring additional power into the clean water facility. Notifications have been delivered to impacted businesses and PSE will provide updates if their schedule changes. Work will happen after 7 p.m. on weekdays.

Fun fact of the week

People have been using pumps to move water since the year 2000 BC! The first pump, called a “shadoof,” was created by the Egyptians as a tool for watering their fields. It has a long rod with a bucket at one end and a weight at the other. Today the shadoof is still commonly used in many parts of Africa, Asia, and some parts of India.

Anticipated work June 22 – June 27:

  • Preparing to relocate utilities and place pipes for new bathrooms in Windjammer Park.
  • Preparing to start work to level areas identified for new Windjammer Park elements.
  • Bathroom locker installation begins, and fixture installation continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks and secondary treatment buildings (#1 and 3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Water line installation continues around the site.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, June 23, during normal working hours.

6/14/2018 – Powering up!

Electric wire installation in the electrical building(#9)

We’ve marked several milestones in our weekly updates so far this year and this week is no different. After completing wiring in the electrical building last week (#9 on the map above) the construction team successfully turned on the electricity. The electrical building contains all the electrical equipment needed to monitor and maintain electricity throughout the clean water facility, much like the breaker box in your home. Turning the power on in this building means that we can begin to conduct preliminary tests in other areas as equipment is installed.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that most Americans used gas light and candles to illuminate their homes for 50 years after Thomas Edison made it possible to use electric light bulbs? In 1882 Edison helped form the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of New York which brought electricity to parts of Manhattan. However, most Americans did not start using electric light bulbs until 1925 when scientists were able to reduce the cost of light bulbs and increase their efficiency.

Anticipated work June 15 – June 20:

  • Work continues to clear and prepare Windjammer Park sites for park improvements.
  • Continuing to install flooring and bathroom fixtures in the administration building (#11).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks and secondary treatment buildings (#1 and 3).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, June 16, during normal working hours.

6/7/2018 – The smell of clean air

Carbon vessel installation in the odor control area (#7)

Last week we installed our carbon vessels in the odor control area (#7 on the map above). These vessels act like filters and are filled with activated carbon, the same material used in a faucet or Britta filter. Once our facility is up and running, air coming from the facility will be funneled through these vessels before it’s released. The activated carbon will catch decomposing organic material left in the air, which is typically the culprit for any smelliness you would otherwise notice.

Arriving soon!

Our summer newsletter is fresh off the press. Expect to see them in your mailboxes soon.

Fun fact of the week

The word “carbon” originated from the Latin word “carbo” for coal. For thousands of years humans knew carbon as coal until in 1772 Antione Lavoisier showed that it is its own unique chemical entity. Lavoisier was the first to identify carbon as an element in his textbook Traité Élémentaire de Chimie published in 1789.

Anticipated work June 8 – June 13:

  • Continuing to clear and prepare Windjammer Park sites for park improvements.
  • Installing flooring and bathroom fixtures in the administration building (#11).
  • Electrical wiring continues at the secondary treatment and headworks building (#1 and 3).
  • Work to install window frames and glass continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site.
  • Stairway installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, June 9 during normal working hours.

05/31/2018 - Work continues inside the administration building

Work on the administration building continues.

The interior of the administration building (#11 on the map above) is beginning to come together! Next week we’ll be polishing the floors and installing bathroom fixtures. In future weeks we’ll be working to install tiles, carpet, windows and completing electrical work. When we’re ready to begin operation, staff will monitor water quality in the new administration building lab and track all facility system functions.

Fun fact of the week

The new Windjammer Park will feature a nature play area. Did you know playing outside has numerous potential benefits for children? Studies have shown that outdoor play can increase attention span, promote social skills, increase vitamin D levels, and even improve vision!

Anticipated work June 1 – June 6:

  • Electrical wiring continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work to install window frames and glass continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and at the headworks building (#1).
  • Stairway installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, June 2 during normal working hours.

5/24/2018 - Celebrating 150 construction updates

Aerial view of the nrew facility taken on May 1.

Over the past 150 updates we’ve followed the project through some exciting milestones. From the start of outfall construction and our groundbreaking celebration to the removal of our giant crane once the buildings were complete, you’ve been with us through it all. As building exteriors keep taking shape and our work moves inside, we look forward to continuing to share our progress. Thank you to everyone who has been involved in this project through attending meetings, sharing feedback on facility design, or reading our updates.

Reminder: Windjammer Park improvements underway

Fencing is in place around Windjammer Park and access to parts of the park is restricted. Over the next year, crews will be working on improvements to the park which include a splash park, nature play area, and more. Want to get outside this weekend? Check out our website (www.oakharborcleanwater.org) for other beautiful City parks to explore while we work, more information on the project, and a map of the park closure area.

Fun fact of the week

The word for the 150th anniversary of something is sesquicentenary – say that 150 times fast! The only animal currently capable of living for 150 years is the giant tortoise. And for all the folks that like to play with numbers, 150 is a Harshad number which means when you divide it by the sum of its individual digits you get a whole number (1+5+0 = 6 and 150/6 = 25).

Anticipated work May 25 – May 30:

  • Electrical wiring continues at the headworks, secondary treatment, and electrical buildings and the emergency generator area (#1, 3, 9 and 10).
  • Work to install window frames and glass continues in the headworks, solids, aeration blower, and administration buildings (#1,5, 8, and 11).
  • Biosolid dryer installation continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and at the headworks building (#1).
  • Stairway installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • There will be no work this weekend or on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28.

5/17/2018 - Major milestone for the solids building

Fencing in place along the waterfront trail.

This week we started installing the biosolids drier machine. The biosolids drier machine is the main piece of equipment in the solids building (#5 in the diagram below). After being separated from liquid wastewater, microscopic solids will be sent to the biosolids drier where hot air will be used to dry the solid waste as it travels across a wide conveyor belt. The dry solids are great fertilizers and will be trucked off site to use on golf courses, farms, community gardens, and more.

New! Waterfront Trail signage

Fences are now in place and large portions of Windjammer Park are closed for construction of new park amenities. The Waterfront Trail, Lagoon, and ballfields will remain open during this time, although we expect the trail will move as construction advances. To help you navigate the Waterfront Trail we are posting signs to mark the trail as it shifts. For more information on the park closure or improvements, please visit the park page.

Fun fact of the week

Conveyor belts have been used since the 19th century. Thomas Robins, an inventor who worked with Thomas Edison, began work on the conveyor belt in 1891. The original use for the conveyor belt was for carrying coal and other mineral resources and products. In 1900, the conveyor belt received the grand prize at the world’s fair in Paris!

Anticipated work May 18 – May 24:

  • Work on electrical wiring continues at the headworks and secondary treatment buildings (#1 and 3).
  • Work to install window frames and glass continues in the headworks, aeration basin area, solids, electrical, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 5, 9 and 11).
  • Flooring installation continues in the administration building (#11).
  • Pipe installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, May 19, during normal working hours.

5/10/2018 - Windjammer Park Improvements

Windjammer Park improvements sign posted on teh waterfront trail.

We are preparing to start work on Windjammer Park improvements next week. If you’ve walked the waterfront trail recently, you’ve probably seen our signs about the new park amenities we’re building. Amenities will include a splash park, basketball and pickleball courts, new kitchen and restrooms, improved landscaping and lawn areas, and a public plaza for community events. Starting on Monday, we’ll be placing fencing around the park areas where these new amenities will be built. For more information visit our homepage.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know that the sport of pickleball was invented on Bainbridge Island? One summer afternoon in 1965, Joel Prichard, Barney McCallum, and Bill Bell invented the game as a form of summer entertainment for their kids. They named the game pickleball, in part, for the Pritchard’s dog Pickle who liked to chase the ball and run off with it.

Anticipated work May 11 – May 17:

  • Work on electrical wiring continues at the headworks building, secondary treatment building, solids building, and emergency generator area (#1, 3, 5 and 10).
  • Flooring installation at the administration building begins (#11).
  • Roof installation continues at the maintenance building (#6).
  • Pipe installation continues at the headworks building and secondary treatment building (#1 and 3).

For more information and what to expect during construction:


5/3/2018 - The emergency generator has landed

Lowering the emergency generator onto the platform in area #{10}

This week our emergency generator was delivered! When the Clean Water Facility opens, this generator will have an important job providing back-up and emergency support during power outages. This means the Clean Water Facility will keep running smoothly, continuing to process wastewater flows, even when the power goes out. We all know the wind blows in Oak Harbor.

Fun fact of the week

The first known electric generator was invented by the German scientist Otto von Guericke in 1660. Guericke’s machine was called an “electrostatic generator.” It was much smaller in size than the generator at the Clean Water Facility and worked by using friction to create static electricity. Today, electrostatic generators can still be found in science classrooms where they are used to demonstrate the incredible forces of electricity to students.

Anticipated work May 4 – May 10:

  • Work on electrical wiring continues at the headworks building, secondary treatment building, and solids building (#1, 3, and 5).
  • Tile installation begins in the administration building bathroom (#11).
  • Roof installation continues at the Maintenance building (#6).
  • Stair installation continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Pipe installation continues at the headworks and secondary treatment buildings (#1 and #3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building (#11) and at the solids building (#5).
  • Painting begins at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, May 5, during normal working hours.

4/26/2018 - UV light install complete

UV rectors in the secondary treatment building (#3)

The inside of the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above) is coming together! At the end of March, UV equipment was delivered (see our update from March 30, 2018) and now some very important pieces of equipment, the UV reactors, are installed. The UV reactors are important because they disinfect wastewater after the solids have been removed. The reactors produce the ultraviolet rays that breakdown any remaining harmful microorganisms before the cleaned water flows back into Oak Harbor Bay.

Windjammer Park closure expected to begin mid-May

To complete construction of the Clean Water Facility and begin Phase 1 improvements on the new Windjammer Park, the park will be closed mid-May 2018 through late spring 2019. During the closure the waterfront trail, lagoon, and ballfields will remain open and summer events will be held in other locations.

Fun fact of the week

You can use UV rays at home to disinfect! Try air drying your clothes outside on a nice sunny day. When the UV rays in sunlight combine with water in your damp clothes, a special type of oxygen is produced that does the cleaning. So, the next time the sun comes out, bring your laundry outside.

Anticipated work April 27 – June 3:

  • Roof installation continues at the Maintenance building (#6).
  • Stair and exterior brick installations continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Pipe installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3) and at the headworks building (#1).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building (#11).
  • Painting continues in the secondary treatment and administration buildings (#3 and 11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, April 28, during normal working hours.

4/19/2018 - Bubbles are back

Installing black diffusion heads on bubbler pipes

A few weeks ago, we talked about “bubbler pipes” that were being installed at the bottom of the aeration basins (see our update from March 8, 2018 for more info). Crews continued to work in the aeration basins (#2 on the map above) by attaching an important part of the bubbler pipe called the “diffuser head.” The diffuser head creates fine air bubbles, each of which are roughly the size of a pencil tip. The size of each bubble is important, since smaller bubbles transfer more oxygen to microorganisms, which helps keep them healthy, breathing, and doing their job. More importantly tiny bubbles also save a lot of energy.

Windjammer Park closure expected to begin mid-May

To complete construction of the Clean Water Facility and begin Phase 1 improvements on the new Windjammer Park, the park will be closed mid-May 2018 through late spring 2019. During the closure the waterfront trail, lagoon, and ballfields will remain open and summer events will be held in other locations. To learn more about summer event locations, the City’s other beautiful parks with rental facilities, and park improvements, or for more information, visit our website.

Fun fact of the week

Humpback whales use bubbles as part of an ingenious feeding technique called “bubble net feeding.” Typically solitary animals, these whales will come together in groups of 3 to 60 to use this technique. Working collaboratively the whales heard schools of fish into tight circles while exhaling bubbles from their blow holes to disorient them. When the whales are ready, they swim upward with their mouths wide open to catch the fish. From above, it looks like the ocean is boiling!

Anticipated work April 20 – April 26:

  • Metal roofing is being installed at the headworks building (#1).
  • Overhead light installation continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Stair and exterior brick installation continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Pipe installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration, maintenance and solids buildings (#5, 6 and 11).
  • Painting continues in the secondary treatment and administration buildings (#3 and 11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, April 21, during normal working hours.

4/12/2018 - We have buildings!

Administrative building (#11) looking southwest.
Solids building (#5) looking southeast.

All 11 structures on the map below are now built! For months we have been talking about these buildings taking shape through concrete foundation pours, CMU block wall installation, and roof installation. After all that hard work, every building that will make up the new Clean Water Facility is now structurally complete. Next up – finishing the exteriors, completing the interiors, and continuing to install equipment.

Fun fact of the week

Between 1912 to 1948 architects competed in the Olympic games. The rules and categories varied over the years, but all entries had to be inspired by or used for sport. Many architects won for their park designs, including American Charles Downing Lay during the 1936 games in Berlin. Charles won the silver medal for his plans for Marine Park in Brooklyn, New York. These games were notable for many other reasons, including Jesse Owen’s historic gold medal wins in the track and field competitions.

Anticipated work April 13 – April 19:

  • Overhead light installation continues at the headworks building (#1).
  • Stair and exterior brick installation continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Pipe installation continues at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building and solids building (#5 and 11).
  • Painting continues in the secondary treatment building and administration building (#3 and 11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, April 14, during normal working hours.

4/5/2018 - It’s electric!

Pulling wires from a vault

This week we hit a huge project milestone. On Monday, Puget Sound Energy (PSE) installed a transformer on site and turned on the power for the first time. PSE and project crews completed tests to make sure energy is safely available to the site. Power was turned off once the tests were complete, so crews could continue to install equipment without harm.

Fun fact of the week

Benjamin Franklin conducted extensive research on electricity in the 18th century, inventing the lightning rod in 1749 to protect houses from the destructive forces of lightning. In the event of a lightning strike, the lightning rod conducts electricity through a house safely using a wire connected to the ground.

Anticipated work April 6 – April 12:

  • Overhead light installation begins at the headworks building (#1).
  • UV dryer installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Stair and exterior brick installation continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • North canopy install continues at the maintenance building (#6).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and in the aeration basins and secondary treatment building (#2 and 3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building and solids building (#5 and 11).
  • Painting continues in the secondary treatment building and administration building (#3 and 11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, April 7, during normal working hours.

3/30/2018 - Grab your sunglasses!

Brick wall and wood frame

Crews are preparing for the delivery of UV equipment next week. UV equipment will be installed in the secondary treatment building (Area #3 on the map above). UV treatment, which kills bacteria, is the last step in treating wastewater before the cleaned water flows into Oak Harbor Bay. For more information on the treatment process click here!

Windjammer Park closure planned for later this spring

To complete construction of the Clean Water Facility and make Phase 1 updates to Windjammer Park, the park will be closed starting as early as May 2018 through spring 2019. Visit our homepage for more information.

Fun fact of the week

Even though UV light cannot be seen by the human eye, there are plenty of animals who can see it. Bees can see some of the UV light spectrum reflected off the petals of flowers and use it to locate pollen. Some species of bird also use the light to help tell the difference between males and females based off their UV markings.

Anticipated work March 30 – April 5:

  • Overhead lights are being installed in the headworks building (#1).
  • Roofing is being installed at the administration building (#11).
  • Stair and landing installation continues at the secondary treatment building and exterior brick installation begins (#3).
  • North canopy install continues at the maintenance building (#6).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and in the aeration basins and secondary treatment building (#2 and 3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building and solids building (#5 and 11).
  • Painting continues in the headworks building and the secondary treatment building and begins at the administration building (#1, 3 and 11).

3/22/2018 – Raising the roofs!

Metal roofing on Administration Building

This week, crews continue working on roof at the headworks, maintenance, and administration buildings (#1, 6, and 11 on the map above). At the Administrative building, crews are installing Gypsum wall boards, more commonly known as drywall. Gypsum wall boards are an important material for forming interior ceilings and walls.

Fun fact of the week

Some of the oldest roofing materials in the world are natural materials like thatch, clay, and stone. Thatch roofing can be traced to 5000 and 1800 B.C., while clay tiles can be traced as far back to 10,000 B.C. These days, metal roofing is used because it is much lighter in weight and more durable than past roofing materials.

Anticipated work March 23 – March 29:

  • Pipe installation continues around the site and in the aeration basins and secondary treatment building (#2 and 3).
  • Work on window openings and frames continues at the administration building and solids building (#5 and 11).
  • Interior stair installation begins at the solids building and continues at the secondary treatment building (#3 and 5).
  • Painting continues in the headworks building and the secondary treatment building (#1 and 3).
  • Work will occur Saturday, March 24, during normal working hours.

3/15/2018 - Administration building continues to take shape

Administration building beams

This week, crews continued work on the exterior of the administration building including brick work and glulam beams (for more info on glulam, see our Jan. 18 update). Crews also worked on the window openings, making sure they will keep water out of the building. This technique, called “window flashing” is an important step to take prior to installation to ensure the building’s interior is protected from the elements.

Fun fact of the week

The word window originates from the Old Norse word “vindauga”, meaning wind-eye. When first recorded in the 13th century B.C. it referred to an unglazed hold in a roof to bring light into houses during the day. The large windows on the administration building (see the photo rendering of the future building) are going to bring in a lot of light during our sunny Oak Harbor days!

Anticipated work March 16 – March 22:

  • Exterior brick work continues on the administration building (#11).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and in the aeration basins and secondary treatment buildings (#2 and 3).
  • Cassette support installation for the membrane bioreactor continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues inside the headworks building and for the odor control structure (#1 and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the headworks, solids, and administration buildings (#1, 5, and 11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, March 17, during normal working hours.

3/8/2018 - Weekly Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility Construction Update

Bubbler pipes

Blowing bubbles

This week, crews started installing piping in the bottom of the aeration basin (#2 in the map below). These pipes, called “bubbler pipes,” have disks that create a lot of small air bubbles. The air bubbles move up into the aeration basin to keep microorganisms healthy, breathing, and doing their job. To learn more about what microorganisms do in the aeration basin, check out our website.

Fun fact of the week

Bubbles have been keeping people entertained for hundreds of years. During the 18th and 19th centuries, children used leftover washing soap to blow bubbles. In the early 1940s, Chemtoy, a chemical company that sold cleaning supplies, made a big splash in the toy world by bottling and selling bubble solution. Since then, kids and adults have been forever blowing bubbles.

Anticipated work March 9 – March 15:

  • Exterior brick work continues on the administration building (#11) and continues on the aeration blower and electrical buildings (#8 and 9).
  • Pipe installation continues around the site and in the aeration basins and secondary treatment buildings (#2 and 3).
  • Cassette support installation for the membrane bioreactor continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Roof installation continues on the headworks, solids, and administration buildings (#1, 5, and 11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, March 10, during normal working hours.

3/1/2018 - Weekly Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility Construction Update

Switchgear installation

Progress at the headworks building

This week, crews made significant progress toward finishing the CMU block walls on the headworks building (#1 on the map below). Exterior brick work has begun, and roof installation is expected to wrap up next week. Brick work continues at the aeration blower and electrical buildings (#8 and 9). Over at the administration building (#11) roof work continued and exterior brick work is planned to begin next week.

Fun fact of the week

Switchgears are a part of the electrical power distribution system that keeps the facility energized. The switchgear receives energy into the site and distributes it appropriately to the equipment and buildings around the site. From the switchgear, crews will be able to control power distribution and turn off areas of the facility that don’t need power or need maintenance.

Anticipated work March 2 – March 8:

  • Pipe installation continues around the site and inside the aeration basin building (#2).
  • Cassette support installation for the membrane bioreactor continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Roof installation continues on the headworks, solids and administration buildings (#1, 5, and 11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, March 3, during normal working hours.

2/22/2018 - It’s a brick…wall(s)!

Exterior brick installation using crane.

This Friday, crews will finish the exterior brick work on the aeration blower and electrical buildings (#8 and 9 on the map below). Once all the buildings are complete, the brick finish will be all around the exterior of the site, with the exception of the wood and glass administration building (#11). Across the site at the solids building (#5), crews continue to install roofing and coat the CMU blocks to protect against the elements.

Fun fact of the week

Stonemasonry is one of the earliest trades in civilization’s history. It started around 10,000 BC when people began to use fire to make plasters, mortars, and quicklime. These new materials allowed folks to stop dwelling in caves and start living it up in homes of stone, straw, and mud.

Anticipated work February 23 - March 1:

  • Exterior brick and roof installation continues on the headworks building (#1).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2) and inside the aeration basin, secondary treatment, solids, and aeration blower buildings (#2, 3, 5, and 8).
  • Cassette support installation for the membrane bioreactor continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Roof installation continues on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, February 24, during normal working hours.

2/15/2018 - Headworks and administration buildings take shape

Glulam installation on the administration building (#11)

Crews finished building the CMU block walls that make up the exterior of the headworks building (#1 on the map above) this week. Soon they will build the roof of the building, which will include metal and PVC layers with skylights. This week, crews also continued working on wood frame exterior of the administration building (#11). The wood frame is made out of long, wood beams called "glulam" beams. For more information about glulam beams, check out our January 18, 2018 construction update.

Fun fact of the week

Glulam was patented in Germany and first used in the United States in 1934. Glulam was used in the interiors of buildings until a fully water-resistant adhesive became available in 1942. The glulam used in the exterior of our administration building is water-resistant.

Anticipated work February 16 - 22:

  • CMU block wall installation wraps up on the headworks building (#1).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2), inside the aeration basin, secondary treatment, solids, and aeration blower buildings (#2, 3, 5, and 8), and at the former base of the tower crane.
  • Cassette support installation for the membrane bioreactor will begin in the secondary treatment building (#2).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Wood framing installation continues on the administration building (#11).
  • Backfilling will occur.
  • Work will occur Saturday, February 17, during normal working hours.

2/8/2018 - Bye-bye, tower crane

Tower crane is dismantled

We said goodbye to the tower crane this weekend. Thanks to those of you who stopped by to see the spectacle. This week, crews began backfilling the area where the crane used to stand. This area is just east of the southeast corner of the aeration basins building (#2 on the map above). Eventually, the area will be covered with pavement for facility staff to walk and drive.

Hello, bridge crane

Last week we introduced you to the secondary treatment building’s (#3) newest resident, a bridge crane. This week, crews completed load testing on the crane, making sure that the crane can hold enough weight. The crane passed the load test with flying colors and is considered fully operational.

Fun fact of the week

We’re getting used to seeing the site without our giant tower crane, which was 150 feet tall. Our crane would’ve towered over the Tower of London, which is only 89 feet tall!

Anticipated work February 9 - 15:

  • CMU block wall installation wraps up on the headworks building (#1).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2) and inside the aeration basin, secondary treatment, solids, and aeration blower buildings (#2, 3, 5, and 8).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Backfilling will occur at the former base of the tower crane.
  • Work will occur Saturday, February 10, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur February 12, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building

2/1/2018 - SE City Beach St closed Friday and Saturday

Bridge crane in the secondary treatment building (#3)

Our resident site giant – the 150-foot tower crane – is moving to a new home this weekend. Crews will remove the crane from our site Friday and Saturday, February 2 and 3. SE City Beach St will be closed south of SE Bayshore Dr to facilitate the crane removal on these days. The work is weather dependent. If needed due to wind delays, SE City Beach St will also be closed on Sunday, February 4. Please follow the directions of signage and construction crew members to safely access your destination.

Bridge crane moves into secondary treatment building

While we begin to remove our giant outdoor crane, crews are installing an indoor crane in the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). This crane is a “bridge crane” and will help remove and replace filters in the membrane bioreactor. After installation is complete, crews will work to hook the crane up to a power source so it can move across the building on rails. You can see the blue and yellow bridge crane in the photo below. The blue bar is the bridge and yellow equipment attached to it is the trolley and hoist, the part of the crane that will lift filters.

Fun fact of the week

The first overhead crane powered by electricity (just like our bridge crane) was created in 1876. The crane was used to lift guns at the Royal Arsenal in London. These types of electric cranes were mass-produced at a German factory beginning in 1910.

Anticipated work February 2 - 8:

  • CMU block wall installation continues on the headworks building (#1).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2) and inside the aeration basin, secondary treatment, and aeration blower buildings (#2, 3, and 8).
  • Bridge crane installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3) and begins in the solids building (#5).
  • Concrete work continues for the odor control building and emergency generator area (#7 and 10).
  • SE City Beach St will be closed south of SE Bayshore Dr Friday and Saturday, February 2 and 3, for crane removal.
  • Work will occur Saturday, February 3, during normal working hours.

1/25/2018 - Project milestone approaches

Smoothing concrete in the headworks building (#1)

If you’ve been following along with the project, you know that concrete is a large part of our work. Concrete makes up all the foundations, floors, and most walls for the facility buildings. The project is approaching a big milestone - most of the structural concrete work (foundations, floors, and walls) is almost complete. This means that concrete work in the headworks, secondary treatment, aeration blower, and electrical buildings will be finished soon (buildings #1, 3, 8, and 9 on the map above).

Tower crane removal next weekend

Crews are planning to move the 150-foot tower crane off of the project site next weekend. SE City Beach St is expected to be closed south of SE Bayshore Dr to facilitate crane removal February 2 and 3.

Fun fact of the week

With crews pouring concrete almost every week, we’ve poured a lot of concrete for the new Clean Water Facility - 11,573 cubic yards, to be exact. That’s about 1.5 times bigger than the Goodyear blimp!

Anticipated work January 26 - February 1:

  • Stairway installation continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • CMU block wall installation continues on the headworks building (#1).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2) and inside the secondary treatment and aeration blower buildings (#3 and 8).
  • Bridge crane installation begins in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Interior painting continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Roof installation continues on the solids and administration buildings (#5 and 11).
  • Damp-proofing continues on the odor control building walls (#7).
  • Concrete work continues for the emergency generator area (#10).
  • Work will occur Saturday, January 27, during normal working hours.

1/18/2018 - We’re positively beam-ing

Glulam beam installation

This week, crews worked to build the roof on the administration building (#11 on the map above). The roof will include very long beams over open space without supporting columns. The beams that support this part of the roof are called glulam, or glued laminated timber. Glulam beams are made of layers of wood attached together with durable, moisture-resistant glue. They are stronger than other types of beams, like single cut timbers. Glulam beams are commonly used to span wide areas without columns, like this section of the administration building.

Tower crane removal this February

The tallest piece of equipment on site, our 150-foot tower crane will be removed from the project site in a few weeks. SE City Beach St will be closed south of SE Bayshore Dr to facilitate crane removal February 2 and 3.

Fun fact of the week

The crew working on the administration building’s wood frame and roof includes local residents! Four of the five wood-framing crewmembers hail from Oak Harbor.

Anticipated work January 19 - 25:

  • Stairway installation continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • CMU block wall installation continues on the headworks building (#1).
  • Concrete work in the headworks, secondary treatment, aeration blower, and electrical buildings is almost complete (#1, 3, 8, and 9).
  • Pipe installation continues on top of the aeration basin building (#2) and inside the secondary treatment and aeration blower buildings (#3 and 8).
  • Bridge crane installation begins in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Interior painting continues in the solids building (#5).
  • Roof installation continues on the solids and administration buildings (#5 and 11).
  • Damp-proofing continues on the odor control building walls (#7).
  • Concrete work continues for the emergency generator area (#10).
  • Work will occur Saturday, January 20, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur January 22, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

1/11/2018 - Thar we blow!

Aeration blower

The aeration blower building (#8 on the map above) got some new equipment this week with the arrival of the blower machines. These machines will pump air into the aeration basins to stimulate the waste-eating microorganisms present in the basins. It will take a couple weeks to install the blowers. Check out this week’s picture to see what the blowers look like, inside and out.

Tower crane removal this February

The biggest eye in the Oak Harbor sky (our 150-foot tower crane) will be dismantled and escorted out of Oak Harbor in a few weeks. We’re sad to see our hardworking friend go, but this is a big milestone for the project. During this work on February 2 and 3, SE City Beach St will be closed south of SE Bayshore Dr to make sure the crane departs safely.

Fun fact of the week

The aeration blower machines will keep the blown air between 32 and 86 degrees. This temperature range prevents the microorganisms from dying (colder than 32 degrees) or multiplying too quickly (warmer than 86 degrees). Want to learn more about how these tiny creatures help treat wastewater? Check out http://www.oakharborcleanwater.org/Project/TreatmentProcess.

Anticipated work January 12 - 18:

  • Stairway installation continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, odor control, and electrical buildings (#1, 3, 7, and 9).
  • Interior painting continues in the secondary treatment and solids buildings (#3 and 7).
  • Pipe installation continues in the secondary treatment and aeration blower buildings (#3 and 8).
  • Roof installation continues on the solids and administration buildings (#5 and 11).
  • Exterior brick installation wraps up on the solids building (#5).
  • Damp-proofing will begin on the odor control building walls (#7).
  • Blower installation begins in the aeration blower building (#8).

Work will occur Saturday, January 13, during normal working hours.


1/4/2018 - Happy New Year!

Exterior wood framing on the administration building (#11)

The Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility team hopes you had a pleasant holiday. Since our last update, the crews have been hard at work building the new facility. They completed half of the exterior wood framing on the administration building (#11 on the map above) and began painting the interior of the secondary treatment and electrical buildings (#3 and 9). Crews also continued installing the decorative brick that covers the construction masonry unit (CMU) block walls that currently make up the solids building (#5). The exteriors will finish up over the next few months. Extensive mechanical and electrical work will occur this winter and spring inside the structures.

Fun fact of the week

Most of the buildings in the new Clean Water Facility are made out of CMU blocks, which are similar to cinder blocks. The administration building’s exterior is unique on the site, as it’s made out of wood. The administration building will not house any large equipment, but it will house the offices, control systems, and laboratories necessary to operate the facility. Want to see what the buildings will look like when exteriors are complete? Check out the final design.

Anticipated work January 5 - 11:

  • Stairway installation continues in the headworks building (#1).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks and odor control buildings (#1 and 7).
  • Pipe installation continues in the secondary treatment and aeration blower buildings (#3 and 8).
  • Interior painting continues in the secondary treatment and electrical buildings (#3 and 9).
  • Roof installation begins on the solids building (#5) and continues on the administration building (#11).
  • Exterior brick installation continues on the solids building (#5).
  • Community drop-in hours will occur January 8, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building

12/21/17 - See you in 2018!

Holiday lights on the crane

It’s been a great year on the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility project. We built walls and roofs for future buildings, welcomed centrifuges to the site, celebrated the past and present of Oak Harbor Public Works on Family Fun Day, and heard your thoughts on the future of Windjammer Park. Thanks for following along with our progress so far.

Holiday schedule

Crews will not work December 23 - 25 and December 30 - January 1, in observance of the Christmas and New Year holidays. This is the last construction update of this year. Updates will resume in 2018. The next drop-in session will be January 8. The Clean Water Facility team wishes everyone a happy holiday season.

Fun fact of the week

The Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce is hosting the third annual New Year’s Eve Fireworks in Windjammer Park! Head on down to the park to check out the show, which begins at 9 p.m.

Anticipated work December 21 - January 4:

  • Stairway installation continues in the headworks and maintenance buildings (#1 and 6).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, odor control, and aeration blower buildings (#1, 7, and 8).
  • Various piping, equipment, and electrical installations continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Exterior brick installation continues on the solids building (#5).
  • Roof installation continues on the maintenance building (#6).
  • Wood framing installation continues at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will not occur December 23 - 25 or December 30 - January 1.

12/14/17 - Centrifuge installation

Centrifuge installation in solids building (#5)

Remember those large centrifuges that arrived in crates in early November? Crews began installing them this week in the solids building (#5 on the map above)! The centrifuges are so big that before crews could begin roof construction, they lifted the centrifuges into place using a crane. The centrifuges have a rotating portion that will help separate solids from liquids in Oak Harbor’s wastewater. To check out more information on the solids process, visit the project website.

Holiday schedule

Crews will not work December 23 - 25 and December 30 - January 1, in observance of the Christmas and New Year holidays. We will be sending out the last construction update of the year next week on December 21 and the next drop-in session will be January 8.

Fun fact of the week

Centrifuges have many benefits over traditional solids-separating machines. For example, centrifuges are often actually smaller than traditional belt machines! They are also easy to clean and require minimal oversight to perform effectively.

Anticipated work December 14 - 20:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks and odor control buildings (#1 and 7).
  • Various piping, equipment, and electrical installations continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Exterior brick installation continues on the solids building (#5).
  • Stairway installation continues in the maintenance building (#6).
  • Roof installation continues on the maintenance and aeration blower buildings (#6 and 8).
  • Wood framing installation continues at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, December 16, during normal working hours.

12/7/17 - Preparing for indoor cranes

Crane rail beam installation in secondary treatment building (#3)

Crews are installing crane rail beams inside the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). Eventually, the crane rail beams will support a bridge crane that spans across a large room. The bridge crane will help remove and replace filters in the membrane bioreactor. After passing through the membrane bioreactor, liquid waste moves on to UV treatment (#4) and solids go to the solids building (#5). To check out more information on the treatment process, visit the project website.

Fun fact of the week

The Sandhill crane is the only species of crane recorded in Washington. They nest in wetlands surrounded by pine or fir forests for part of the year. Sandhill cranes have been found nesting and migrating in Klickitat, Yakima, Adams, Grant, and Douglas Counties. You’re unlikely to see any Sandhill cranes on the Clean Water Facility site, but you will see our 123-foot yellow crane!

Anticipated work December 7 - 13:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks and odor control buildings (#1 and 7).
  • Various piping, equipment, and electrical installations continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Crane rail beam installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Exterior brick installation begins on the solids building (#5).
  • Roof installation continues on the maintenance building (#6).
  • Stairway installation continues in the maintenance building (#6).
  • Wood framing installation continues at the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, December 9 during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur on December 11, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

11/30/17 - Blocks and bricks

CMU installation on solids building (#5)

Crews are working off their Thanksgiving dinners this week by building the walls of the new solids building (#5 on the map above). Just like they did for the secondary treatment, maintenance, and aeration blower buildings (#3, 6, and 8), crews first install concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks, then fill them with grout. Next week, crews plan to finish the CMU block walls and begin building a brick façade on the outside of the walls. This brick will match the facility design renderings that you can see on the project information page.

Fun fact of the week

Masonry (brick laying) is a construction technique that dates back to ancient Egypt. The Romans brought masonry techniques to Europe, including Holland and England. Although brick and stone were used widely in Europe by the Middle Ages, it took time for them to be included in building codes. The Great Fire of London in 1666 resulted in new building regulations that required new buildings to be made of brick or stone instead of wood or thatch.

Anticipated work November 30 - December 6:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks and odor control buildings (#1 and 7).
  • Stairway installation begins on the headworks and maintenance buildings (#1 and 6).
  • Various piping, equipment, and electrical installations continue at the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete block installation continues to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior brick installation begins on the solids building (#5).
  • Roof installation begins on the maintenance building (#6).
  • Wood framing installation continues on the administration building (#11).

11/22/17 - Happy Thanksgiving from the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility team!

Pipe work in secondary treatment building (#3)

Crews are working to install roofs, pipes, and walls this week before taking Thursday and Friday off to celebrate Thanksgiving. No major work will occur over the long weekend. When no work occurs over a long period of time, like Thanksgiving weekend, a crew member does a thorough walk-through of the site to make sure everything is in tip-top shape before the site is quiet for a few days.

Fun fact of the week

Many Oak Harbor tables will be graced with cranberries on Thursday. Did you know that early settlers of Whidbey Island grew cranberries on the marshy areas near Cranberry Lake in Deception Pass? The settlers’ tart crop inspired the lake’s name.

Anticipated work November 22 - 29:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues at the headworks and odor control buildings (#1 and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction will begin on the administration building (#11).
  • No work will occur Thursday, November 23, through Sunday, November 26 in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur November 27, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

11/17/17 - Rain, rain, we’re okay

Pipe installation in the secondary treatment building (#3)

Steady progress has been made this week despite the heavy wind and rain hitting the project site. Crews poured less concrete than planned, as rain can ruin the concrete finish (learn more in this week’s fun fact below). Workers kept themselves busy by installing pipes near the secondary treatment and odor control buildings (#3 and 7 on the map below), and continuing to build PVC and metal roof layers on the secondary treatment building (#3).

Thanksgiving is next week! Like many in Oak Harbor, our crews are taking a few days off to celebrate. The site will be closed with no work happening Thursday, November 23 through Sunday, November 26. Work will resume Monday, November 27 during normal working hours. We plan to send next week’s construction update earlier in the week.

Fun fact of the week

Concrete must fully dry in order to transform from a liquid to a solid, strong material. Cold weather increases drying time, which is one of the reasons crews use heaters and insulating covers when pouring concrete in the winter. Crews are less likely to pour concrete slabs when it’s raining. If rainwater hits the surface of wet concrete, it ruins the surface of the concrete. Luckily, our crews are used to Oak Harbor weather and have measures in place, like heaters, tents, and insulating covers, to cure the concrete and prevent rain from hitting wet concrete.

Anticipated work November 16 - 21:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues at the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction will begin on the administration building (#11).

11/9/17 - Secondary treatment building taking shape

City Councilmembers visit the secondary treatment building

If you walk by the Clean Water Facility construction site, you’ll see a lot going on. One of the most noticeable things you’ll see is the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). It’s the building that looks most complete on site - at least from the outside! Inside, crews are connecting pipes that will bring wastewater from the aeration basins (#2), through the membrane bioreactor, and out to the UV treatment area (#4).

Crews are also finishing the exterior of the secondary treatment building by completing the roof and damp proofing the walls. When you walk by the site, remember that the black exterior of the building is just the damp-proofing material, which will be covered by red-colored brick before the project is complete.

Fun fact of the week

Members of Oak Harbor City Council toured the site on Monday! They walked around the site and got to see the buildings taking shape, including the busy secondary treatment building. We update City Council on project progress at most of their meetings. To see our past updates to City Council, check out the Library page on the project website.

Anticipated work November 9 - 15:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues at the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment, solids, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#3, 5, 8, and 9).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction will begin on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, November 11, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur Monday, November 13, 2 - 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

10/26/17 - Roof installations continue

Installing metal roof on aeration blower building

Crews are working to complete the roof of the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above) by adding layers of insulation and PVC this week. The PVC and insulation are installed in a sandwich order on top of a metal roof: first a layer of PVC lining, then a layer of insulation, then a top layer of PVC. The insulation helps maintain the building temperature. Crews also began installing metal roof layers on the solids, aeration blower, and electrical buildings this week (#5, 8, 9). PVC and insulation layers will be added after these metal roofs are complete.

Fun fact of the week

PVC is a thick, flexible plastic. PVC stands for polyvinyl chloride membrane, a complicated-sounding term for plastic made from chlorine, carbon, and other elements. PVC is a weather resistant material - great for our rainy winters! This weather-resistant quality is why PVC is a good choice for the top layer of the facility roofs.

Anticipated work October 26 - November 1:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues at the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment, solids, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#3, 5, 8, and 9).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction continues on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, October 28, during normal working hours.

10/19/17 - Going up to the second floor

Damp proofing treatment on electrical building (#9)

This week, crews continued to build a metal staircase in the northwest corner of the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). The secondary treatment building will be one of the larger buildings in the new facility and will include two floors. The membrane bioreactor (MBR) will be located on the bottom floor and the second floor will include resources for facility staff, like offices and restrooms.

Damp-proofing making way for brick exteriors

We heard some questions after last week’s construction update on damp proofing. In pictures (like the one included below), the odor control, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#7, 8, and 9) look black. That’s the damp-proofing material in action. Damp proofing has finished up on these buildings, but the exteriors are not yet complete. Before the buildings are finished, the black material will be covered by our skilled masons with the red bricks that you’ve seen in renderings.

Fun fact of the week

Installing a staircase to the second floor of the secondary treatment building had us thinking about things that are second this week. Did you know that the Congressional District for Island County is the second district? Island County is also the second-smallest county in Washington by area (517 square miles). Good things do come in the second-smallest packages!

Anticipated work October 19 - 25:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues at the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Staircase installation wraps up in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction begins on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, October 21, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours October 23, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

10/12/17 - Damp proofing against wet weather

Damp proofing electrical building (#9)

Crews are applying “damp proof” coatings to the walls of the aeration blower and electrical buildings (#8 and 9 on the map above). The black-colored coatings form a barrier that prevents moisture from getting into the building and causing damage.

Staysail RV Park closing

The Staysail RV Park in Windjammer Park is closing permanently starting this Sunday, October 15, to make room for Windjammer Park improvements. Last year, the City of Oak Harbor worked with the community to create a plan for updating Windjammer Park in coordination with a Community Advisory Group. The planning process concluded that modernizing the RV Park would require the city to greatly reduce the number of RV stalls provided. City Council and the Community Advisory Group recommended removing the RV Park to make room for other park amenities.

Fun fact of the week

A gateway pavilion, restrooms, basketball courts, a large kitchen, and other amenities will replace the Staysail RV Park. For more information on future park updates, visit www.oakharborcleanwater.org/Park.

Anticipated work October 12 - 18:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, 5, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues near the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Roof installation continues on the secondary treatment and aeration blower buildings (#3 and 8).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Damp proofing continues on the walls of the aeration blower and electrical buildings (#8 and 9).
  • Exterior wood framing construction begins on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, October 14, during normal working hours.
  • The Staysail RV Park will close permanently beginning Sunday, October 15.

10/5/17 – Concrete work on the solids building

This week, crews continued to pour concrete for the solids building (#5 on the map above), including curbs, floors, and walls. This structure will be one of the smaller buildings in the new facility, but it will house a very important piece of machinery: the biosolids dryer. Solid waste will travel across a belt while hot air flows over it. The waste will dry before it leaves the unit.

Fun fact of the week

Concrete pouring for solids building

We’re not sure if using biosolids as fertilizer is technically reusing or recycling, but we do know that biosolids are rich in nutrients and are often used to stimulate the growth of plants on golf courses, farms, and community gardens.

Anticipated work October 5 - 11:

  • Roof installation continues on the aeration blower building (#8) and begins on the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, and 7).
  • Various pipe installation continues near the headworks, secondary treatment, and odor control buildings (#1, 3, and 7).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids building (#5).
  • Exterior wood framing construction begins on the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, October 7, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours October 9, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

9/28/17 - Connecting headworks and membrane tanks

Pipe installation in secondary treatment building

This week, crews continued to install large pipes between three buildings on site. The pipes will carry “secondary influent,” liquid that has been screened once to remove heavy materials, grit, and sediment. The pipes will move the secondary influent from the headworks building (#1 on the map above) to the aeration basins building (#2), then onto the membrane bioreactor in the secondary treatment building (#3). Check out our website for details on what happens in each building.

Fun fact of the week

The secondary influent pipes installed this week are 36 inches in diameter. They’re pretty big - we could stack five footballs horizontally in the pipe opening and still have room. We’ll leave the football-slinging to Russell this week, though. Go Hawks!

Anticipated work September 28 - October 4:

  • Stair installation continues in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Roof installation begins on part of the aeration blower building (#8).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 7, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation continues near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the solids and maintenance buildings (#5 and 6).
  • Work will occur Saturday, September 30, during normal working hours.

9/21/17 - Pipes of all sizes

Clean Water Facility construction, March 2016 - August 2017

This week, crews continued to install multiple types of pipes around the site. Small four-inch diameter pipes were installed to bring potable water to the facility, as well as water to be used in case of a fire. Also being installed this week is a 24-inch diameter effluent pipe to carry treated water from the facility to the Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact of the week

Clean Water Facility construction started a little over two years ago! During that time, we’ve seen soil excavated, foundations created, pipes installed, and walls rise up. Check out the time lapse video below to get a good look at everything we’ve accomplished.

Anticipated work September 21 - 27:

  • Roof installation continues on part of the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 7, and 11).
  • Various pipe installations will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the maintenance, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#6, 8, and 9).
  • Work will occur Saturday, September 23, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours September 25, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

9/14/17 - Roof starts to take shape

Roof installation on secondary treatment building

The Clean Water Facility is hitting a major milestone this week—installation of the first roof! This week, crews started to place a roof on part of the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above) where the future membrane bioreactor will be located.

Fun fact of the week

Crews started building the roof by installing trusses, the horizontal metal elements shown in the picture below. The trusses use triangular shapes to evenly distribute weight and stress. This simple engineering principle is used in structures of all sizes to hold up the roof, as well as on bridges.

Anticipated work September 14 - 20:

  • Roof installation continues on part of the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 7, and 11).
  • Various pipe installations will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the maintenance, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#6, 8, and 9).

9/7/17 - Aeration blower and maintenance buildings rise out of the ground

One type of bench in the Windjammer Park Phase 1 intermediate design

Aeration blower and maintenance buildings rise out of the ground

This week, crews are building walls that extend above ground for the maintenance and aeration basin blower buildings (#6 and 8 on the map above). To do this, they’re using the same concrete masonry unit blocks, or “CMU blocks,” as they did for the secondary treatment building (#3). After the blocks are placed, crews fill them with grout. For more details on CMU blocks, check out our June 22 construction update.

Check out the future Windjammer Park online

Missed the open house in August? The intermediate Phase 1 design for Windjammer Park is available on the Park page.

Fun fact of the week

Looking for a place to sit and view the water? In addition to big elements, like the splash park and plaza, the Phase 1 design for Windjammer Park includes smaller details, like benches. We know that views of the water are important to Oak Harbor community members. The bench included below is one of multiple types that will be included in the updated Windjammer Park. Check out the intermediate design for Phase 1, including other park furnishings, on the Park page!

Anticipated work September 7 - 13:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 7, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the maintenance, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#6, 8, and 9).
  • Work will occur Saturday, September 9, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours September 11, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

8/24/17 - Check in on Windjammer Park design this evening

Bird's eye rendering of the Windjammer Park Phase 1 intermediate design.

Click to enlarge

Join us tonight anytime between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. at City Hall (865 SE Barrington Dr) to check out the intermediate Phase 1 design for Windjammer Park, talk to project staff, and ask questions. Can’t make it tonight? The updated design is also available . See a sneak preview of the design to the right!

Natural gas line

Over the past two weeks, we’ve talked about foul air pipes and potable water pipes. This week, crews continued pipe work by installing a natural gas line to the solids building (#5 on the map above). The natural gas will connect to the building and help heat the air that will be used to dry to the biosolids.

Fun fact of the week

The Oak Harbor community hosts several signature events throughout the year. We’re planning to build a public plaza in Windjammer Park to showcase and support these events. Check out the intermediate design for the future plaza and the rest of Phase 1 tonight, August 24, at City Hall between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. You can also see it online until September 7!

Anticipated work August 24 - 30:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, aeration blower, electrical, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment, maintenance, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#3, 6, 8, and 9).
  • Leak testing will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3). Learn about leak testing in our June 9 construction update.
  • Community check-in on Windjammer Park August 24, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., at City Hall.
  • Community drop-in hours August 28, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.
  • The Windjammer Park updated design will be available online until September 7.

8/17/17 - Pipes for potable water

Installing potable water pipe

This week, crews continued their work installing pipes around the site. The potable water pipes will carry water that is safe for drinking throughout the facility. The pipes currently being installed are only 4 inches in diameter or smaller. 4 inches is shorter than the height of many popular smart phones! In comparison, the pipes carrying potable water in your home are one half or three quarters of an inch in diameter.

See what Windjammer Park will look like in the future

Some big changes are coming to Windjammer Park! The team has updated the design with public feedback we heard in January. We are ready to share the intermediate design with you. Join us in person on August 24 anytime between 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at City Hall. If you can’t make it on August 24, the updated design will be available online starting the same day. Stay tuned for more details.

Fun fact of the week

Wish you had a way to cool off this summer? Splash parks are common features in parks around the country. A splash park is a shallow area featuring kid-appropriate spray nozzles and interactive elements. Check out the design for the future splash park in Windjammer Park on August 24!

Anticipated work August 17 - 24:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, electrical, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment, maintenance, and aeration blower buildings (#3, 6, and 8).
  • Leak testing will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3). Learn about leak testing in our June 9 construction update.
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 19, during normal working hours.
  • A community check-in on Windjammer Park will occur August 24, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., at City Hall.

8/10/17 – Odor control walls

Aerial view of the site as of August 2

Last week, we learned how crews are installing a network of pipes to bring "foul air" to the odor control building (building #7 above) for treatment. The odor control building is taking shape as the pipes are installed. Crews completed the foundation and are busy forming and pouring the structure's walls. These walls will contain equipment that will process foul air and ensure no odors can be smelled outside of the facility.

Check out the updated Windjammer Park design!

In January, Oak Harbor community members shared preferences for Windjammer Park design inspirations. The design team has worked to make those inspirations a reality and are ready to share the updated design with you! It's time to see preliminary details and drawings, talk to project staff, and learn more.

Join us in person on August 24 anytime between 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at City Hall. If you can't make it August 24, the updated design will be available online starting the same day. Stay tuned for more details.

Fun fact of the week

You may have noticed that crews have been doing a lot of concrete work the past few months. In total, they've poured 9,320 cubic yards of concrete. That might sound like a lot, but it's only one-third as big as a typical hot air balloon, which is 26,000 cubic yards. The facility's concrete weighs a lot more than a hot air balloon, though - a typical hot air balloon weighs only 190 lbs! Crews are have poured almost three-quarters of the facility's concrete.

Anticipated work August 10 - 16:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, aeration blower, electrical, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Leak testing will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3). Learn about leak testing in our June 9 construction update.
  • Moment frames will be installed in the administration building (#11).
  • Community drop-in hours will occur August 14, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.
  • Community check-in on Windjammer Park will occur August 24, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., at City Hall.

8/4/17 - Installing pipe network

Installing foul air pipe

If you stop by the site, you might see multiple pipes being installed at once. This week, crews are installing a "foul air" pipe and connecting it to the odor control structure. The foul air pipe will contain, you guessed it, air that smells bad! A network of pipes will bring the smelly air to the odor control building (#7 on the map above) for treatment. The odor control process removes odors from the air before releasing it into the surrounding area.

Fun fact of the week

The foul air pipes run all around the site, connecting multiple buildings to the odor control structure. The pipes vary in diameter, ranging from 20 inches to a whopping 42 inches! The larger pipe, shown below, brings all the foul air from the other pipes to the odor control structure.

Anticipated work August 3 - 9:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, aeration blower, electrical, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11).
  • Various pipe installation will occur near the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 11).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Leak testing will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Moment frames will be installed in the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, August 5, during normal working hours.

7/21/17 - Secondary treatment building walls continue to grow

CMU blocks installed on teh secondary treatment building (#3)

Crews continue to install concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks to build the secondary treatment building walls (#3 on the map above). The building's walls are rising quickly out of the ground and stand over 16 feet tall! After crews place the CMU blocks, they fill the blocks with grout. CMU blocks will be used to build the solids, aeration blower, and electrical buildings (#5, 8, 9) beginning in August.

Fun fact of the week

We've talked about many buildings that will help keep the facility operational. The administration building (#11) is our last one of the series. Here, facility staff will monitor quality in a lab and maintain system functions via a control network. The administration building will include an interpretive center, where you'll be able to learn more about the City and facility.

Anticipated work July 19 - 26:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, aeration blower, and administration buildings (#1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11).
  • Finishing coats will continue to be applied to aeration basin walls (#2).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Leak testing, crack repairs, and finishing coat application will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Pipe installation will occur in the maintenance and administration buildings (#6, 11).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 22, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur July 24, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

7/13/17 - Applying finishing coat on aeration basins

Applying finshing coat to an aeration basin wall

Crews are applying a finishing coat on the walls of some of the aeration basins (building #2 on the map above). A finishing coat is a light layer of mortar that crews apply to the basin walls. Crews are still testing some membrane tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3) for leaks and will eventually apply the finishing coat to the tanks, too. While finishing coats are applied, crews are continuing to work on other elements of the aeration basins.

Fun fact of the week

Welcome back to the buildings that support the wastewater cleaning process. This week, we’re in the emergency generator building (#10). Wastewater doesn’t stop flowing when the power’s out! This building’s name says it all - the emergency generator will provide back-up and emergency support in case of a power outage. The power this building provides will help make sure the cleaning process continues so wastewater doesn’t back up into streets or homes.

Anticipated work July 13 - 19:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, odor control, aeration blower, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11).
  • Finishing coats will continue to be applied on aeration basins (#2).
  • Concrete blocks will continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Leak testing and crack repairs will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 15 during normal working hours.

7/6/17 - Forming the administration building

Installing electrical conduits to protect future wiring.

After a fun and safe Fourth of July holiday, crews are continuing to build the administration building (#11 on the map above). This week, they’re working to build a stem wall, which is made of both concrete and the same CMU blocks that were used to create walls of the secondary treatment building (#3 - see our June 22 update below for an explanation of CMU blocks). Stem walls are built around the concrete slab that is the foundation floor. The stem walls help prevent structural damage and direct groundwater around the building’s foundation.

Enjoy Race Week, July 10 - 14!

We wish you all a fun Race Week next week. Clean Water Facility construction is not anticipated to affect any of the festivities.

Fun fact of the week

We’re talking about buildings that support the wastewater cleaning process. This week, we’re in the electrical building (#9). Treating the City’s wastewater requires reliable electric power. Equipment in this building will monitor the facility’s electricity and relay information to the facility staff. Did you know that electricity was first mass-produced in the Puget Sound region in 1886? At the time, much of the electricity in the region was created using hydropower.

Anticipated work July 6 - 12:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, aeration blower, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11).
  • Pipe installation continues in the aeration basins area (#2).
  • Concrete blocks continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Crack repairs and leak testing will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur on Saturday, July 8 during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur July 10, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

6/29/17 - Enjoy Fourth of July in Windjammer Park!

Pouring concrete for part of odor control structure (#7) foundation.

Join your neighbors in Windjammer Park next Tuesday, July 4, to celebrate the holiday! Work will not affect the festivities. For more information, visit the City's website. Enjoy a safe and fun Fourth.

Odor control structure foundation progresses

The odor control structure (#7 on the map above) is taking shape. This week, crews worked to build foundation floors and walls. They also began installing drain lines under the floors, which will remove liquid from the structure. The odor control technology will remove odors from the air before air leaves the facility.

Fun fact of the week

We're talking about buildings that support the wastewater cleaning process. This week, we're in the aeration blower building (#8). Blowers in this building pump air into the aeration basins (#2) to stimulate the waste-eating microorganisms. The air must be kept above freezing and below 86 degrees F. A temperature sweet spot is key: too cold and the microorganisms don't survive; too hot and too many grow.

Anticipated work June 29 – July 5:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, aeration blower, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11).
  • Pipe installation continues in the aeration basins area (#2).
  • Concrete blocks continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Crack repairs will continue on membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will not occur Monday and Tuesday, July 3 and 4, in observation of the July Fourth holiday. Windjammer Park is open for traditional July Fourth festivities!

6/22/17 – Secondary treatment building rises out of the ground

Starting foundations for maintenance (#6) and administration (#11) buildings

The secondary treatment building’s underground foundation is complete (#3 on the map above)! Crews are now working to build the walls that extend above ground. They’re using a material called “CMU blocks,” or concrete masonry unit blocks. These are similar to cinder blocks you might use in a backyard project. After the blocks are placed, crews fill them with grout.

Footings for maintenance and administration buildings

This week, crews continued to form the beginnings of foundations for the maintenance and administration buildings. Crews installed forms and rebar to create footings, which are horizontal elements that sit under the base of a wall or column and help distribute the weight of the foundation.

Fun fact of the week

We’re back to talking about buildings on site. We’ve talked about where the flow goes. Now, let’s talk about the buildings that keep the flow flowing. The maintenance building (#6) will hold equipment that to help make sure Clean Water Facility equipment stays in tip-top shape. This equipment will help facility staff inspect equipment, make adjustments, and perform repairs as needed.

Anticipated work June 22 - 28:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, maintenance, aeration blowers, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11).
  • Pipe installation continues in the aeration basins area (#2).
  • Concrete blocks continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Testing for cracks will continue on three MBR tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Work will occur Saturday, June 24, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur June 26, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

6/16/17 – Crane rail columns formed

Finishing forms for crane rail columns.

Crane rail columns formed

This week, crews continued to form and pour concrete for crane rail columns. These columns will support cranes in the secondary treatment building (#3 on the map above). The cranes will move equipment and materials within the building. To build the columns, crews use metal and wood to create forms. They pour concrete into the forms, wait until the concrete is set, and then remove the forms.

Fun fact of the week

The cranes will move many different types of equipment in the new secondary treatment building, including the membranes in the membrane bioreactors (MBRs). As we learned in April, the membranes separate solids from liquid in the wastewater flow. The cranes will switch out membranes when they need to be serviced.

Anticipated work June 15 - 21:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, solids, and administration buildings (#1, 3, 5, and 11).
  • Pipe installation continues in the aeration basins area (#2).
  • Concrete blocks continue to be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Testing for cracks will continue on three MBR tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Soil stabilization system installation will continue for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Work will occur Saturday, June 17, during normal working hours.
Aerial photo showing construction site June 2, 2017.

6/9/17 - Testing membrane bioreactor tanks for cracks

Installing blocks for secondary treatment building.

Crews began testing the membrane bioreactor (MBR) tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3) this week. To test for leaks, which are caused by small cracks in the concrete, crews fill the tanks with water and let the water sit for a few days. Next, crews measure how much water has receded in the tank. Some water is expected to recede because concrete is a porous material. If more water has receded than expected, crews check for larger cracks in the concrete and fix any they find. Small cracks are normal since concrete shrinks when it dries. Check out this week’s fun fact to see what happens to tiny cracks.

Installing pipes in basins

Crews also started installing pipes in the aeration basins building (#2) this week. These pipes will funnel water to spray nozzles. The spray nozzles will distribute water within the tank to help control any foam or frothing that naturally occurs while bacteria consumes part of the wastewater.

Fun fact of the week

Concrete can heal small cracks by itself! When concrete is near moisture, like the new aeration basins and MBR tanks, it creates a material called calcium hydroxide. Small crystals form when calcium hydroxide is exposed to air. These crystals heal the crack.

Anticipated work June 8 - 14:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, secondary treatment, and solids buildings (#1, 3, and 5).
  • Pipe installation will occur in the aeration basins area (#2).
  • Concrete blocks will be installed to form walls for the secondary treatment building (#3)
  • Testing for cracks will occur on three MBR tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Electrical duct bank installation will continue near the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Soil stabilization system installation will continue for the odor control structure (#7).
  • Foundation work will occur for the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, June 10, during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur June 12, 2 - 4 p.m., at the Whidbey Island Bank Building.

6/1/17 - Completing decks for secondary treatment building

Family Fun Day paricipants navigate the safety course

Pipe installation continues

This week, crews completed elements of the future Clean Water Facility. One of these elements was building decks for the secondary treatment building’s structure (#3 on the map above). Next, crews will begin to create the outside of the building. This building will house the membrane bioreactor (MBR), which will use a very small filter to help separate solid and liquid waste. You can learn more about the MBR treatment process on the treatment technology page.

Completing pipe installation

Crews also completed installing manholes and pipe near the headworks building (#1) this week. The pipe will bring all wastewater from Oak Harbor into the facility. The manholes will allow Clean Water Facility staff to access the pipe for any necessary repairs.

Fun fact of the week

Manhole covers in and around the new Clean Water Facility will be round, just like those you see in your neighborhood. Manhole covers are round for multiple reasons. Round covers will not fall into the circular opening of the pipe, which makes them safer than a square cover. A square cover would also need to be rotated to align with the pipe below - a round cover also does not.

Anticipated work June 1 - 7:

  • Concrete work continues for the headworks and solids buildings (#1 and 5)
  • Hydrostatic testing for cracks will occur on three MBR tanks in the secondary treatment building (#3)
  • Electrical duct bank installation continues near the secondary treatment building (#3)
  • Soil stabilization system installation will continue for the odor control structure (#7)
  • Water and sewer line installation wraps up for the administration building (#11)

5/25/17 - Celebrating 100 construction updates!

Family Fun Day paricipants navigate the safety course

Pipe installation continues

This week, crews continued to install a large pipe near the headworks building (#1 on the map below). The pipe is 24 inches in diameter and will bring all wastewater from Oak Harbor homes, businesses, and other buildings into the facility.

Thanks for coming to Family Fun Day!

The Oak Harbor Public Works Department had a blast with over 350 community members last Saturday. Thank you for joining us and celebrating all that Public Works does for the Oak Harbor community.

Fun fact of the week

Did you know Oak Harbor became a city just over 100 years ago? Did you know that record high temperatures for Oak Harbor have never reached 100 F? Did you know that this is our 100th construction update? We look forward to continuing to share more project updates with you as the project progresses!

Anticipated work May 25 - 31:

  • Sanitary sewer line installation continues near the headworks building (#1)
  • Electrical duct bank installation continues near the secondary treatment building (#2)
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, secondary treatment, and solids buildings (#1, 2, 3, and 5)
  • Backfilling and concrete work continues for the solids building (#5)
  • Soil stabilization system installation will continue for the odor control structure (#7)
  • Water and sewer line installation continues for the administration building (#11)
  • No work is anticipated for Monday, May 29, in observation of Memorial Day

5/18/17 - This Saturday is Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park, hosted by Oak Harbor Public Works!

Placing concrete for vortex grit chamber

Swing by Windjammer Park this Saturday, May 20, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for Family Fun Day. You’ll be able to participate in family-friendly activities, learn how the new facility will work, and watch construction and Public Works trucks in action. Family Fun Day celebrates all that Public Works does for the Oak Harbor community and is part of national Public Works Week.

Concrete work for new buildings

Crews continue to place concrete for walls and decks (ceilings/floors) in the headworks building, aeration basins, secondary treatment building, and solids building (#1, 2, 3, and 5 on the map below). Crews are also placing concrete for a vortex grit chamber. For more information on the vortex grit chamber, check out our fun fact from March.

Pipe installation preparation

Crews continued to prepare to install a sanitary sewer line near the new headworks building (#1) this week. The preparation work includes backfilling and compacting material. The line will bring wastewater from Oak Harbor to the facility for treatment. A manhole will also be installed next week, which will enable future Public Works staff members to access the line for maintenance.

Fun fact of the week

The American Public Works Association has sponsored National Public Works Week since 1960. This year’s theme is “Public Works Connects Us.” This theme is spot-on for Oak Harbor this year as Clean Water Facility crews are working on the construction site to connect the future facility to your home, business, and school. You may be able to see crews performing small tasks to build this connection within the construction fencing during Family Fun Day.

Anticipated work May 19 - 24:

  • Family Fun Day will occur in Windjammer Park on Saturday, May 20 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Backfilling and material compacting to prepare for sanitary sewer line and manhole installation continues near the headworks building (#1).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, secondary treatment buildings, and solids building (#1, 2, 3, and 5).
  • Backfilling and concrete work continues for the solids building (#5).
  • Excavation and lagging wall installation continues for the odor control building (#7).
  • Water and sewer line installation continues for the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, May 20 during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur May 22, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

5/11/17 - Celebrate Oak Harbor Public Works at Family Fun Day!

The construction site as of May 2, 2017

Join us on May 20 for Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park, part of national Public Works Week. Stop by the park between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to help us celebrate all that Public Works does for our community. We’ll have family-friendly activities, including an opportunity to see construction and Public Works trucks in action.

Preparation for odor control structure continues

Crews installed dewatering wells near the future odor control structure (#7 on the map below) earlier this week. They also began excavating to make room for the structure and installing lagging walls. Lagging walls help keep soil out of the excavated area while crews work.

Fun fact of the week

Windjammer Park is a special place in Oak Harbor. Equipment will be installed to help make sure the park remains a local destination by keeping facility odor levels as minimal as possible. To do this, air will be pumped from enclosed buildings to the odor control structure (#7), where it will pass through two stages of treatment. In the first stage, air will be "scrubbed" by biological elements that absorb odors. Air continues to the second stage, where it will be "polished" by activated carbon (a fancy form of charcoal) and any remaining odors are absorbed. Treated air will be released outside.

Anticipated work May 12 - 18:

  • Outfall connector work wraps up on SE City Beach St.
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Backfilling and concrete work continues for the solids building (#5).
  • Excavation and lagging wall installation continues for the odor control building (#7).
  • Water line installation continues for the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, May 13 during normal working hours.

5/4/17 - Mark your calendars: Family Fun Day is May 20!

Finishing pile driving for odor control building (#7)

The Oak Harbor Public Works Department is hosting the second Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park on May 20. Stop by the park between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for family-friendly activities, including an opportunity to see construction and Public Works trucks in action.

Pile driving complete for odor control building

This week, crews completed pile driving for the odor control building (#7 on the map below). The installed piles will help stabilize the soil in the area. Crews will install dewatering wells next week to remove excess groundwater from the soil before excavating.

Work on SE City Beach St

This work Crews began work on a minor modification to the outfall connector pipe at the very south end of SE City Beach St this week. This work is anticipated to continue during normal working hours for the next few weeks.

Fun fact of the week

After separating from liquid wastewater via the membrane bioreactor (MBR) in the secondary treatment building (#3), solid waste moves on to the (you guessed it!) solids building (#5). The solids are dried in a solids dryer. In the solids dryer, the waste travels across a belt while hot air flows over it. The solid waste dries as it travels through the unit. After solids are dried, they can be used as fertilizer on golf courses, farms, community gardens, and other locations. This is a cool new way for Oak Harbor to re-use waste!

Anticipated work May 5 - 11:

  • Outfall connector work will occur in SE City Beach St.
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Backfilling continues next to the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Excavation and pipe installation continues for the solids building (#5).
  • Dewatering well installation begins for the odor control building (#7).
  • Water line installation continues for the administration building (#11).
  • Work will occur Saturday, May 6 during normal working hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur May 8, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

4/27/16 - Happy Holland Happening

Setting up Pile Driving Equipment

We're looking forward to the Holland Happening celebrations this weekend. Crews will be on site early Saturday morning, but will be finished with work in time to catch the parade.

Pile driving begins next week

Utility relocation work for the future odor control building (#7) is wrapping up this week. Next week, crews will begin preparing to build the facility's foundation. The first step in this process is to stabilize the soil in the work area. To do this, crews will drive H piles (vertical metal pieces that look like a capital H) into the ground. The piles are hollow and will be filled with grout, a slurry-like cement substance. When the grout hardens, the exterior will be removed and the grout will remain to stabilize the soil. This work is similar to the micropile work that was performed last spring. You can expect increased noise and vibration during this work, which is anticipated to be complete by the end of next week.

Fun fact of the week

After passing through the membrane bioreactor (MBR) in the secondary treatment building (#3), liquids move on to UV treatment (#4), where - you guessed it - wastewater is treated using ultraviolet light. Wastewater will flow through a pipe with UV lamps throughout the pipe interior. The UV light kills bacteria cells in the liquid by damaging their DNA. While the liquid is getting its tan on, the solids are transported to the solids building (#5). Stay tuned next week to learn more about the solids process.

Anticipated work April 28 - May 4:

  • Pile driving begins to prepare for soil stabilization for the odor control building (#7).
  • Utility relocation work wraps up for odor control building (#7).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Backfilling continues next to the secondary treatment building (#3).
  • Excavation continues for the solids building (#5).
  • Work will occur the morning of Saturday, April 29.

4/21/17 - Good luck to marathon runners!

Building Aeration Basin Deck

The Whidbey Island Marathon is this Sunday, April 23 with about 1,900 runners registered so far. Watch out for marathon road closures and runners throughout the island this weekend.

Staysail RV Park to open temporarily

The Parks Department is temporarily opening the western portion of the Staysail RV Park later this week, in time for the Whidbey Island Marathon and Holland Days. For more information, please contact the Parks Department.

Excavating for solids building

Crews began excavating for the future solids building (#5 on the map below) this week. Excavating will make room for piping and drain lines, which will be installed in the coming weeks. You can learn more about the solids building in an upcoming fun fact.

Fun fact of the week

Welcome to building #3, home of secondary treatment. Wastewater’s first stop in building #3 is the membrane bioreactor (MBR). The wastewater, which includes some bacteria from the aeration basin process, passes through an extremely fine membrane. The membrane pores are no larger than one micrometer (0.001 millimeter!) and separate the solids from the liquid in the wastewater flow. The liquid pulled through the pores continues to the UV treatment building (#4) for disinfection. Stay tuned next week to learn more about UV treatment.

Anticipated work April 21 - 27:

  • Excavation continues for the solids building (#5).
  • Utility relocation work continues in the old Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot for the odor control building (#7).
  • Shoring wall installation to stabilize soil in the work area will begin for the odor control building (#7). Installation includes pile driving, which involves increased noise, dust, and vibration. Stay tuned next week to learn more about this activity.
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Community drop-in hours will occur April 24, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

4/13/17 - Concrete work continues; decks formed

Crews continued building walls in the headworks building (#1 on the map below) and decks in the secondary treatment building and aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage (#2 and 3). “Decks” are the surfaces that will be the first and second floors of the building. Click on the video to the right to see deck-building in action!

Fun fact of the week

Remember the bacteria we talked about last week? These bacteria live in the aeration basins (#2) and chow down on organic material in wastewater. For every 1 lb. of waste, ½ lb. of bacteria is produced! That’s a lot of bacteria. After sitting in the aeration basins, wastewater flows into the secondary treatment building (#3), where it is sifted through a membrane. The bacteria go along for the ride - after bacteria passes through the membrane, it is brought back to the aeration basins to eat more organic waste. Stay tuned next week to learn more about membranes.

Anticipated work April 14 - 20:

  • Utility relocation work underneath existing piping for the solids building (#5).
  • Utility relocation work continues in the old Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot for the odor control building (#7).
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Community drop-in hours will occur April 10, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

4/6/17 - Utility relocations begin near old Whidbey Island Bank Building

Building Aeration Basin Deck

Crews began relocating natural gas utilities near the old Whidbey Island Bank Building, including digging trenches and backfilling. Relocating the utilities will make room for the odor control building (#7 on the map above). The parking lot is closed to accommodate the utility relocation work, which is being completed in coordination with utility companies. No utility outages are anticipated due to the work.

Concrete work continues; membrane tanks completed!

Crews completed building membrane tanks for the secondary treatment building (#3) this week (stay tuned for next week's fun fact to learn more about membrane tanks). Crews also continued pouring concrete for walls and decks, which are floors and ceilings above the bottom floor, in the headworks and aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage (#1 and 2).

April showers (and seeds) bring May grass

You might notice new plant life near the project site soon. Some of the soil that was excavated over the course of the project sits in mounds on the project site. This week, crews seeded the soil mounds with grass, which should bring some springtime color to the site and prevent erosion of the soil mounds.

Fun fact of the week

We're in building #2 this week to learn about the aeration basins and waste activated sludge storage. Here, wastewater sits in large tubs called aeration basins for 3 - 6 hours. Air is pumped into the basins and mixed with the wastewater, stimulating the growth of bacteria that consume part of the waste. This process accelerates natural decomposition. The wastewater must be kept above freezing and below 86 degrees to keep the number of bacteria at an ideal level - any colder and the bacteria dies; any warmer and different bacteria grows! Bacteria that has processed organic matter will be stored in the waste activated sludge storage area of the building, where it will either be reused or turned into fertilizer.

Anticipated work April 7 - 12:

  • Excavation work underneath existing piping for the solids building (#5).
  • Utility relocation work in the old Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot.
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 8 during typical work hours.
  • Community drop-in hours will occur April 10, 2 - 4 p.m., Whidbey Island Bank Building.

3/30/17 - Parking lot closes Friday

Creating form for wall

Crews installed four utility vaults near the southwest corner of the old Whidbey Island Bank Building last weekend. The vaults will house utilities that crews are re-routing beginning this Monday, April 3. Utilities must be re-routed to make room for the odor control building (#7 on the map above). The re-routing work requires the project to close the building’s parking lot. You will see new fencing and signage around the lot as early as this Friday, March 31. The parking lot will be re-opened during Windjammer Park Phase 1 work.

Concrete work continues on membrane tanks

Crews worked to build membrane tanks for the secondary treatment building (#3) this week. Membrane tanks are an important part of the wastewater treatment process, which we will continue to describe in the coming weeks’ fun facts. Crews also continued building walls, decks, and channels this week for the headworks and aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage (#1 and 2).

Fun fact of the week

Last week, we learned how small materials will be removed from wastewater in a vortex grit chamber in the headworks building (#1). After leaving the chamber, wastewater will pass through a very fine screen. This screen filters out sediment that passed through the initial coarse screen and the vortex grit chamber. After flowing through these three steps in headworks building, wastewater will enter the aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage (#2). Stay tuned next week to learn about what happens in the aeration basins!

Anticipated work March 31 - April 6

  • Excavation work underneath existing piping for the solids building (#5).
  • Utility relocation work in the old Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot, including installing fencing around the lot.
  • Concrete work continues for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3).
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 1 during typical work hours.

3/24/17 - Weekend utility work

Finishing concrete for aeration basin building
Building a vortext chamber for headworks building

You may notice new fencing near the southwest corner of the old Whidbey Island Bank Building this weekend as crews install four utility vaults. These vaults will provide homes for utilities that will be re-routed beginning April 1. The re-routing work will require the project to close the Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot. The parking lot will be re-opened as part of Windjammer Park Phase 1 work.

Building trenches

This week, crews built rock trenches where compaction grout was installed a few weeks ago for the solids building (#5). The rock trenches stabilize the soil in the area and are 25 feet long, 30 inches wide, and 10 feet deep.

Concrete work progresses

Crews continued building walls and decks this week for the headworks, aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, and secondary treatment buildings (#1, 2, and 3). Crews also poured concrete to build a vortex grit chamber. Check out the fun fact this week to learn more about the vortex grit chamber.

Fun fact of the week

After passing through the heavy material screening in the headworks building (#1) we talked about last week, the wastewater will enter the vortex grit chamber. The chamber swirls wastewater around, which helps smaller, heavier particles (similar to sand, called "grit") settle to the bottom of the chamber for easier removal. What’s next? Stay tuned next week!

Anticipated work March 24 - 30

  • Rock trench work continues where the compaction grout was installed for the solids building.
  • Excavation work underneath existing piping for the solids building.
  • Utility vault installation on the southwest side of the old Whidbey Island Bank Building.
  • Concrete work continues for the aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, headworks, and secondary treatment buildings.
  • Crews will work Saturday, March 25 and Sunday, March 26 during typical work hours.

3/16/17 - Upcoming parking lot closure

Pouring concrete for membrane building
Building forms for waste activated sludge storage basins

The Whidbey Island Bank Building parking lot will be closed starting April 1 for utility work. The closure will allow crews to re-route existing utilities around the future odor control building (#7 on the map below). The parking lot will be rebuilt as part of the Windjammer Park Phase 1 work, after the facility is complete. Crews will begin installing utility vaults to the west of the Whidbey Island Bank Building beginning next week to provide homes for the re-routed utilities. Fencing will be installed prior to the work.

The Daily Grind will be leaving its location later this month. We have appreciated having them as a project neighbor!

Foundation work continues

This week, crews continued building foundation walls, floors, and decks for the future aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage and secondary treatment plant buildings (#2 and 3). Crews also poured concrete to make wastewater channels in the headworks building (#1). The channels will include screens which remove larger items from wastewater. Check out the fun fact this week to learn more about the screening system.

Fun fact of the week

Wastewater will enter the facility through pipes under SE City Beach St and start in the headworks building (#1). The first step in treatment is filtering out the materials that can’t be treated. The headworks channels will include two screens. The preliminary screen will remove heavy material that can’t be treated, such as sticks, paper, rocks, and plastic that have entered the wastewater. What’s the second step? Stay tuned next week!

Anticipated work March 16 - 23

  • Excavation work will occur underneath existing piping for the future solids building.
  • Fencing will be put up prior to utility vault installation on the west side of the old Whidbey Island Bank Building. The utility vaults will be installed in preparation for upcoming utility work for the future odor control building.
  • Foundation work will continue, including building forms and pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls in the aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, headworks, and secondary treatment buildings.
  • Crews will be working Saturday, March 18 during typical work hours.

3/9/17 - Our construction update has a new look

Foundation work continues

This week, crews worked to build foundation walls, floors, and decks for the future aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, headworks, and membrane area.

Compaction grouting complete

This week, crews finished installing compaction grouting and began removing stone column and compaction grout installation equipment from the project site.

Fun fact of the week

This facility may be designed to deal with waste, but we’re wasting no space with the building layout of our site. The site was designed to maximize efficiency of the facility to keep the footprint as small as possible. Stay tuned for future updates that will talk about how flow moves through the facility in an efficient way.

Anticipated work March 9 - 15

  • Foundation work will continue, including building forms and pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls in the aeration basins/waste activated sludge storage, headworks, and membrane area.
  • Crews will be working Saturday, March 11 during typical work hours.

3/2/17 - Stone column installation complete!

Creating form for wall

Crews finished installing stone columns yesterday (Wednesday). The stone columns stabilize the soil beneath the future administration and solid waste processing buildings. Compaction grouting, another soil stabilization technique, is anticipated to be complete early next week. For more information on compaction grouting, see our update from last week.

Fun fact of the week: On March 2, 1853, President Fillmore signed a bill separating Washington Territory from the expansive Oregon Territory. Washington Territory included all of our modern-day state and parts of Idaho and Montana. The border between Washington and Oregon territories was very similar to the current state line.

What's happening this week?

  • Finishing stone column installation
  • Continuing compaction grouting
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, March 4, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Finish compaction grouting
  • Remove stone column and compaction grouting equipment from the site
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls

2/23/17 - Outfall connector equipment installed

Creating form for wall
Pouring concrete for foundation walls

As stone column installation begins to wrap up next week, crews are preparing to start compaction grouting. Compaction grouting is another soil stabilization technique that works to decrease soil settlement and increase the weight that can be placed on the soil. First, a pipe is driven into the ground at the maximum depth that the grout will be installed. Next, the pipe is slowly lifted out of the ground as the grout is poured into the ground, creating a column. The grout expands once installed, moving and stabilizing the surrounding soil. During this work, there may be increased noise and dust, with some vibration.

Curious about the feedback we heard in January regarding Windjammer Park? The summary of what we heard is posted on the Windjammer Park page.

Fun fact of the week: Ancient societies, such as Rome and Mesopotamia, built sewers to remove wastewater from buildings. However, cities only began filtering their wastewater and treating it with chemicals in the 19th century. The new facility will filter and treat wastewater to keep Oak Harbor Bay clean and safe.

What's happening this week?

  • Installing emergency backup valve on the outfall connector
  • Installing stone columns
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, February 25, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Finish stone column installation
  • Begin compaction grouting
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, February 27, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

2/16/17 - Existing treatment plant demolition is complete!

Framework for future membrane tank
Demolition of existing treatment plant complete

This week, crews finished demolishing the existing decommissioned wastewater treatment plant. Part of the new Clean Water Facility will be built in the old treatment plant’s footprint. This week, crews also continued to install stone columns and pour concrete for the foundation.

Staysail RV Park Maintenance
The City is temporarily closing Staysail RV Park for maintenance beginning tomorrow, February 17. The RV Park is anticipated to reopen in late April, just in time for the Whidbey Island Marathon and Holland Happenings. Please visit the City’s website or call the Parks and Recreation Department (360-279-4756) for more information.

Fun fact of the week: Happy early birthday to President George Washington, our state’s namesake, born on February 22! Washington, D.C. is also named after our first president, but he was the only president who did not live in Washington, D.C. while in office.

What's happening this week?

  • Completing demolition of existing wastewater treatment plant
  • Installing stone columns
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, February 18, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Install equipment for the outfall connector; work will occur in a fenced area on SE City Beach St
  • Continue to install stone columns
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Monday, February 20, during normal working hours

2/9/17 - Walls continue to rise

Stone column installation

In addition to installing stone columns, the team continues to be hard at work building the future facility’s foundation. Foundation work takes a lot of concrete and includes building columns, floors, and walls. To date, we have poured 5,550 cubic yards of concrete or about 43% of the total concrete needed to build the facility.

Fun fact of the week: Our project uses Portland cement, which is the most common type of cement used for construction. The cement is named after the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. Portland cement was developed to be similar to Portland stone, a building stone quarried on the isle.

What's happening this week?

  • Installing stone columns
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, February 11, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to install stone columns
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, February 13, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

2/2/17 - Stone column installation begins!

Installing stone columns
Pouring concrete for a wall

Stone column installation began this week. You may have heard increased noise or felt vibrations near the project site. You can expect this during normal work hours until stone column installation is complete, anticipated in early March.

Fun fact of the week: Whidbey Island's Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve, on the west side of Whidbey Island, was the first national historic reserve in the U.S., established in 1978.

What's happening this week?

  • Installing stone columns
  • Building forms for foundation columns, and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns, and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, February 4, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to install stone columns
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns, walls, and decks
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns, walls, and decks

1/26/17 - Pre-drilling for stone column installation

Pre-drilling
Pouring concrete for a future pipe foundation

Stone column installation is beginning soon. To prepare for installation, crews "pre-drill" into the soil, which will help create the holes for stone columns. During stone column installation, crews use a large drill to dig about 25 feet into the ground. Next, a large crane places crushed stone or recycled concrete into the hole and compacts it. The stone creates an underground column and provides stability for the future facility. You can expect increased noise during stone column installation, which will occur during normal work hours.

Fun fact of the week: As the name implies, recycled concrete is created by crushing concrete used in previous projects. Recycled concrete reduces environmental impacts and is less expensive than new concrete.

What's happening this week?

  • Pre-drilling for stone columns
  • Installing and testing pipe beneath concrete slab
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, January 28, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Install stone columns
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls

1/19/17 - Preparing for stone column installation

Preparing site for stone column insulation
Project site as of Jan. 13

This week, crews are preparing part of the site for stone column installation, which will begin on Monday. Preparation includes grading the area to ensure a level installation surface and bringing installation equipment on site. You can expect increased noise during stone column installation, which will occur during normal work hours.

You can still give feedback on the future of Windjammer Park by visiting windjammerpark.participate.online. The website will remain open until January 26.

Fun fact of the week: According to the US Census Bureau, Oak Harbor has a total area of 9.47 square miles, including 0.05 square miles of water!

What’s happening this week?

  • Finishing grading work for the future facility
  • Mobilizing equipment for stone column installation
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, January 21 and Sunday, January 22 during normal working hours

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin stone column installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, January 23, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

1/13/17 - Share your feedback on the future of Windjammer Park online!

Project site as of Jan. 2
Grading work

Grading work and foundation pours: Crews plan to complete grading work this week for the future administration, maintenance, and solids processing buildings. Foundation pours for the future facility continue, focusing on interior walls and columns.

Stone column installation begins next week: Increased noise can be expected. Stone columns help increase the stability of the soil underneath the future facility. This is the same activity that occurred at the beginning of 2016 and will occur inside the project fence.

Interested in shaping the future of Windjammer Park? Thank you to everyone who joined us at Skagit Valley College yesterday. You can still give feedback on how you currently use the park, how you would like to use the park in the future, and the style inspiration of specific park elements by visiting windjammerpark.participate.online. The website will remain open until January 26.

Fun fact of the week: Windjammer Park is 28.5 acres, slightly larger than Alcatraz.

What's happening this week?

  • Continuing grading work for the future facility
  • Building forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation columns and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Install stone columns
  • Continue to build forms for foundation columns and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation columns and walls

1/5/17 - Happy New Year!

Demolishing existing plant
Pouring concrete into column form

Demolition and foundation pours continue. Crews are on track to complete demolition of the existing wastewater treatment plant by mid-January. Crews will begin grading work next week for the future administration, maintenance, and solids processing buildings.

Increased noise starts next week during daytime hours, as stone column installation begins. Stone columns help increase the stability of the soil underneath the future facility. This is the same activity that occurred at the beginning of 2016 and will occur inside the project fence.

Interested in giving feedback on the future of Windjammer Park? Join the project team next Thursday, January 12, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Skagit Valley College (1900 SE Pioneer Way) to share input on the specific design of park elements and how you would like to use those spaces. The open house is in Oak Hall, room A306.

Fun fact of the week: Grading work ensures a level base for future buildings. Grading or leveling can also help water flow properly underground, which can prevent erosion.

What's happening this week?

  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Building forms for foundation walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, January 7 and Sunday, January 8 during daytime hours; increased noise can be expected

What's happening next week?

  • Install stone columns
  • Begin grading work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, January 9, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)
  • Join us for a Windjammer Park open house on Thursday, January 12, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Skagit Valley College (1900 SE Pioneer Way), Oak Hall, room A306

12/22/16 - Happy Holidays!

Project site as of Dec. 16
Tower crane holiday lights

Crews are working to wrap up demolition of the existing wastewater treatment plant, which is anticipated to be complete by the new year. This week, crews also continued to build the future facility’s foundation.

In the new year, crews will begin installing stone columns inside the project area fencing. Stone columns help increase the stability of the soil underneath the future facility and are shaped just as they sound, columns that are dug into the soil and filled with stone. This is the same activity that occurred at the beginning of 2015. You can anticipate increased noise with stone column installation, performed during daytime hours. This work is scheduled to begin the second week of January.

This is our final construction update for the year - see you in January!

Fun fact of the week: Join the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce for the second annual New Year’s Eve fireworks in Windjammer Park! The fireworks show will begin at 9 p.m. on Saturday, December 31. Click here for more information.

What's happening this week?

  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Building forms for foundation walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation walls
  • Work will not occur on Saturday, December 24, Sunday, December 25, or Monday, December 26 in observation of the Christmas holiday

What's happening next week?

  • Continue existing treatment plant demolition
  • Continue to build forms for foundation walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation walls
  • Work will not occur on Saturday, December 31, Sunday, January 1, or Monday, January 2 in observation of New Year’s Day

12/15/16 - SE City Beach St is open!

Repaving SE City Beach St
Adjusting formwork

Crews repaved SE City Beach St earlier this week after installing the outfall connector. The street is swept and open to vehicle and pedestrian traffic. Thank you for your patience while we completed an intermediate roadway repaving. The final restoration will be completed near the end of the Clean Water Facility Project work.

Demolition of the existing wastewater treatment plant and future facility foundation work both continued this week. Demolition is anticipated to be complete by the end of December.

Please note the community drop-in session on Monday, December 26 is cancelled. Drop-in sessions will resume in January.

Fun fact of the week: Street names in the U.S. tend to have two or three components: the individual part of the name ("City Beach"), the indicator of the type of street ("Street"), and a directional indicator if necessary ("SE"). The most common individual street name in the U.S. is "2nd," which we can count Oak Harbor as having!

What's happening this week?

  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Building forms for foundation walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation walls

What's happening next week?

  • Continue existing treatment plant demolition
  • Continue to build forms for foundation walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation walls

12/8/16 - Paving planned on SE City Beach Street

Removing forms on a finished wall

Crews have begun to restore SE City Beach Street after installing the outfall connector. If weather permits tomorrow (Friday), crews plan to pave the street. Restoration work is anticipated to be complete next week, weather permitting, followed by re-opening the street.

This week, crews also continued to demolish the existing wastewater treatment plant and build the future facility's foundation.

Fun fact of the week: We describe paving as a weather-dependent activity because rain and cold temperatures can both cool the hot asphalt mix as it is spread, making it more difficult to compact. Light sprinkles and Pacific Northwest mist don't create many issues, but a steady rain, low temperatures or snow might. Conditions should allow paving to occur on Friday.

What's happening this week?

  • Restoring SE City Beach Street, including paving if weather permits
  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Building forms for foundation walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation walls
  • Quiet work may occur past 7 p.m. on some evenings, with increased light equipment used

What's happening next week?

  • Continue existing treatment plant demolition
  • Continue to restore SE City Beach Street, including paving if weather permits
  • Continue to build forms for foundation walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Dec. 12, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

12/1/16 - Connecting the outfall connector

Removing forms on a finished wall
Demolishing existing plant

This week, crews installed the remaining sections of the outfall connector on SE City Beach St. Crews are working to connect the new pipe to the previously installed outfall pipe, which was installed last summer in Oak Harbor Bay. A diver will install several valves at the end of the outfall pipe this week and next week. This work is anticipated to be complete next week.

While work on SE City Beach St is wrapping up, work on the future facility is continuing at full speed. Crews are demolishing the existing wastewater treatment plant and building the future facility's foundation with forms, rebar, and concrete. Sewer service will not be disrupted during this work, as all current influent (i.e. flushed toilets) is diverted to the Lagoon Facility at the Navy Seaplane Base.

Fun fact of the week: A league (as in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea) is measure equivalent to three nautical miles. The diver connecting the outfall and the connector won't be nearly that deep, working at a relatively shallow 20 feet beneath the surface of Oak Harbor Bay.

What's happening this week?

  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Installing outfall connector, including pipe and manhole installation and restoring SE City Beach St
  • Building forms for foundation walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation walls
  • Quiet work may occur past 7 p.m. on some evenings, with increased light equipment used

What's happening next week?

  • Continue existing treatment plant demolition
  • Continue outfall connector installation work, including restoring SE City Beach St
  • Continue to build forms for foundation walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation walls

11/17/16 - Night work at project site

Pouring concrete for a wall
Preparing to install outfall connector

This week, crews continued working to install the outfall connector on SE City Beach St, demolish the existing wastewater treatment plant began this week, and form floors and walls for the future facility foundation. Increased noise can be expected for the existing treatment plant demolition. Please note that tonight (Thursday night), crews will work past 7 p.m. to install the outfall connector, which requires increased lighting.

Crews will work a limited schedule next week to observe the Thanksgiving holiday. The next email update will be after the holidays. Wishing you a safe and pleasant holiday from the project team!

Fun fact of the week: You can’t miss it as our nights get longer - the Clean Water Facility Project team plugged in holiday lights on the 150-foot-tall tower crane. Almost 4,000 feet of string lights were used!

What's happening this week?

  • Demolishing existing treatment plant, including relocating utilities
  • Continuing outfall connector installation work, including pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Quiet work may occur past 7 p.m. on some evenings, with increased light equipment used

What's happening next week?

  • Continue existing treatment plant demolition
  • Continue outfall connector installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Work will not occur Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 25 - 27, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday

11/10/16 - Existing treatment plant demolition begins

Demolition begins
Placing outfall connector

Demolition of the existing wastewater treatment plant began this week. The work will continue into next week and increased noise can be expected. Sewer service will not be disrupted during the work, as wastewater will continue to be pumped to the Seaplane Base Lagoon Plant.

This week, crews continued work to install the outfall connector on SE City Beach St. The pipe will be fully installed in the coming weeks. The street will be fully paved and restored before its anticipated opening in early December.

Fun fact of the week: The Clean Water Facility Project is honored to have multiple veterans working on the project. We thank them and all our veterans for their service this Veterans Day.

What's happening this week?

  • Removing sidewalk on east side of project site as part of existing treatment plant removal
  • Relocating a generator near the existing treatment plant
  • Continuing outfall connector installation work, including pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Work will occur on Saturday, Nov. 12, during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to relocate the generator
  • Continue outfall connector installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Nov. 14, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

11/3/16 - Work on the existing plant

Placing rebar for wall
Aligning outfall connector

In the coming weeks, crews will work to dismantle the existing wastewater treatment plant to make room for the administration and maintenance buildings for the new Clean Water Facility. Wastewater will continue to be pumped to the Seaplane Base Lagoon Plant for treatment. This week, crews began the work by removing shrubs on the east side of old plant to relocate a water service.

In addition to ongoing foundation work for the future facility, crews worked to install the outfall connector in SE City Beach St this week. The connector is anticipated to be fully installed by mid-November. Once completed, it will connect the previously installed outfall to the future facility.

Fun fact of the week: Shrubs and trees are among the flora that dot the area near Oak Harbor's waterfront. While they may look similar, trees and shrubs are very different plants. Trees generally grow to be over 20 feet tall and have one trunk. Shrubs are smaller than trees and generally have many stems rising from one base of roots.

What's happening this week?

  • Relocating water line and removing shrubs to prepare for existing treatment plant removal
  • Continuing outfall connector installation work, including excavation, and pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Remove sidewalk on east side of project site to prepare for existing treatment plant removal
  • Continue outfall connector installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls

10/27/16 - What is the outfall connection pipe?

Removing completed formwork
Preparing outfall connector

This week, crews continued installing the outfall connection pipe on SE City Beach St. Once installed, this pipe will connect the future facility to the new outfall, which was installed in Oak Harbor Bay last summer. Outfall connector work is anticipated to wrap up in November. Foundation work for the future facility also continued this week.

Fun fact of the week: Treated water from the future facility will flow through the outfall connector to the outfall pipe in Oak Harbor Bay. This water will be highly treated to Dept. of Ecology standards before it enters the sound, making it safe for the Bay's ecosystem.

What's happening this week?

  • Continuing outfall connector installation work, including excavation, and pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, Oct. 29, during daytime hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue outfall connector installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls

10/20/16 - Installing the new outfall pipe

Welding support steel
Work on the outfall connection pipe

Crews continued excavating, installing new manholes, and laying the new outfall connection pipe on SE City Beach St this week. Foundation work, including placing rebar, building forms, and pouring concrete, also continued this week. The webcam above shows how foundation work is progressing.

Fun fact of the week: A welding helmet is worn by welders to protect their face and neck from sparks, heat, and exposure to infrared and ultraviolet light. The modern welding helmet was invented in 1937. Its basic design, including a tinted window for protected vision, is still used today.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing outfall connection pipe installation work, including excavation, and pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, Oct. 22, during daytime hours

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue outfall connection pipe installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Oct. 24, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

10/13/16 - Installing new manholes

Aerial view of the project site as of October 2
Installing new manhole

Crews continued work on SE City Beach St, including installing new manholes and the outfall connection pipe and continuing excavation. Crews also continued foundation work, which you can view via a webcam on the top of this page.

Fun fact of the week: Crew members worked over 2,000 hours this week. You could have watched about 625 NFL games in that time! We wish our Seahawks well as they take on the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday.

What's happening this week?

  • Continuing outfall connection pipe installation work, including excavation and pipe and manhole installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Continue outfall connection pipe installation work
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls

10/6/16 - Making moves on SE City Beach St

Pouring concrete
Filling old manhole

This week, crews began installing new manholes filling old manholes on SE City Beach St. Crews also poured concrete for foundation floors and walls. Crews will work on Saturday to extend the new outfall connection pipe under an existing water line. Interruptions to water and sewer service are not expected.

Fun fact of the week: Want to follow along with construction every day? Check out the site webcam, which you can view near the top of this page.

What's happening this week?

  • Continuing installation of underground manholes to connect to the existing system
  • Continuing excavation for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Installing outfall connection pipe
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Crews will work Saturday, October 8, during daytime hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue outfall connection pipe installation work, including excavation and pipe installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Oct. 10, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

9/29/16 - Excavation continues for outfall connection pipe installation

Levelling poured concrete
Old outfall pipe uncovered on SE City Beach St.

Crews continued working on two sections of the project this week. Inside the future facility perimeter, crews poured and leveled concrete for the foundation floor and walls. On SE City Beach St./, they installed manholes and excavated for the outfall connection pipe.

Fun fact of the week: Crews have poured over 2,000 cubic yards of concrete on the Clean Water Facility project so far, which is the same volume as 800,000 baseballs. Fall Ball is continuing on the ballfields near Windjammer Park during construction on SE City Beach St. Play ball!

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing underground manholes to connect to the existing system
  • Continuing excavation for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue outfall connection pipe installation work, including excavation and beginning pipe installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls

9/22/16 - Dewatering wells installed for outfall connection pipe work

Crew members
Preparing for outfall connection pipe installation

Last week, crews completed installing dewatering wells that will help manage groundwater levels in the outfall connection pipe work area. This week, crews are installing underground manholes to connect to the existing sewer system pipes in SE City Beach St.

Fun fact of the week: Manhole covers are round for a very important reason. Square covers could fall through a square hole if misaligned. Round covers, which have no corners, can't fall through a round hole that has the same diameter as the cover.

What's happening this week?

  • Installing underground manholes to connect to the existing system
  • Beginning excavation for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Continuing outfall connection pipe installation work, including excavation and pipe installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Sept. 26, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

9/15/16 - Temporary work on SE City Beach St begins

Restriped Parking Log
Pouring Concrete

This week, crews continued ongoing facility foundation work and began mobilizing equipment for outfall connection pipe installation. The Clean Water Facility crew poured 323 cubic yards of concrete this week for facility foundation work!

This morning, crews restriped the parking lot northeast of the project site near the Daily Grind. During the outfall work, site fencing will block the southern parking lot entrance. Cars will now need to enter and exit through the northern lot entrance.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that the Waterfront Trail in Windjammer Park is 2,100 feet long? That's about one-fifth the length of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. During outfall connection pipe installation, access to our locally famous beach walk will still be intact. Follow signs for pedestrian detours.

What's happening this week?

  • Closing part of SE City Beach St and installing fencing for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Mobilizing equipment for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Installing dewatering wells for outfall connection pipe installation
  • Restriping parking lot near the Daily Grind
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Continuing outfall connection pipe installation work, including manhole installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Contractors are invited to an information session on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1 - 3 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way); click here for more info

9/8/16 - Portion of SE City Beach St closed Sept. 12 - Oct. 29

Creating the corner

In addition to ongoing facility foundation work, crews are preparing to install a pipe on SE City Beach St. The pipe will connect the future facility with the outfall pipe, which was installed last fall and will carry treated water from the new facility into Oak Harbor Bay.

SE City Beach St from SE Bayshore Dr to the beach front will be closed Sept. 12 – Oct. 29. During the work, visitors can expect:

  • The parking lot off of SE City Beach St will be closed; visitors may park in the lot off of SW Beeksma Dr or use street parking on SE Bayshore Dr
  • The parking lot near the Daily Grind will be restriped and reduced to one entrance and exit
  • Pedestrian detours along the waterfront trail will be maintained and marked
  • As work on the pipe progresses, fencing may move around the work area
  • The park kitchens closest to SE City Beach St will be closed

For more information, please click here.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that there are opportunities for local contractors to work on the Clean Water Facility? Contractors are invited to an informational session on Sept. 20 from 1 - 3 p.m. to learn more about upcoming opportunities at the project office (321 SE Pioneer Way). For more information, visit Hoffman’s website.

What’s happening this week?

  • Receive deliveries of fencing
  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What’s happening next week?

  • Install fencing on SE City Beach St for outfall pipe installation
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • Close SE City Beach St
  • Restripe parking lot near the Daily Grind
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Sept. 12, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

9/1/16 - Creating a corner

Creating the corner
Working on a rebar wall form

This week, crews made progress on the walls for the future facility, more slabs, building the walls on top of the foundation floor, and joining walls to create a corner. Crews will continue to work on the facility foundation throughout the coming weeks.

Fun fact of the week: Enjoy a safe and fun Labor Day holiday! Be sure to listen to some tunes at the fifth annual Oak Harbor Music Festival, on Pioneer Way all weekend.

What's happening this week?

  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor and walls

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • No work will occur on Labor Day, Sept. 5

8/26/16 - Building up

Building wall forms
Wall forms in place

This week, crews continued building forms and began pouring concrete for foundation walls. The forms for the walls, which you can see in the photos below, are built with reinforced steel instead of wood. The forms are set up vertically and concrete is poured between the steelforms. When the forms are removed, the foundation walls will be complete. Basically we’re making a concrete sandwich.

Fun fact of the week: The excavated area in the project site is almost as large as 15 Olympic-sized Judo mats. Olympian Marti Malloy may not have medaled in Judo this year, but she’s still a gold medalist to us in Oak Harbor!

What's happening this week?

  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor
  • Work will occur Saturday, Aug. 27 during normal working hours

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor and walls
  • No work will occur on Labor Day, Sept. 5

8/19/16 - Preparing to build walls

Smoothing poured concrete
Forms and poured concrete

This week, crews began building forms for foundation walls and continued building forms and pouring concrete for the foundation floor.

Fun fact of the week: Concrete for the future facility foundation is built in a checkerboard pattern, with the foundation floor broken up in to small square sections that are poured one at a time. Pouring in this sequence allows the squares of concrete to shrink a bit as they set without affecting other squares. After the squares dry and shrink, areas between are filled with more concrete and joints are installed. This method of pouring concrete helps create a watertight foundation.

What's happening this week?

  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor
  • Installing underground pipes
  • Crews will work Saturday, August 20

What's happening next week?

  • Pour concrete for foundation walls
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to install underground pipes
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Aug. 22, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

8/11/16 – Pouring the foundation floor

Crane
Building wood and rebar forms for facility floor

Progress continued on the facility foundation this week as crews created additional wood and rebar forms, which hold concrete in place as it dries. The concrete will serve as the future facility’s lower level floor and hold pipe systems. Work on the facility’s walls will begin next week.

Have a blast this weekend at the annual Car Show, Pig Fest, and Hydroplane Races! Clean Water Facility construction should not affect any of the events.

Fun fact of the week: You may have noticed the great signs around the site showing the future facility design, sharing project information, and flying high on the tower crane. Our project signs are printed right here in Oak Harbor by Whidbey Signs! When possible, the project uses local companies and contractors to support the construction of the new Clean Water Facility.

What’s happening this week?

  • Building forms for concrete pours
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor
  • Backfilling excavated areas
  • Continuing to install foam void forms (want to know more about void forms? Check out our 8/4 construction update)

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin building forms for foundation walls
  • Install underground pipes
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor

8/4/16 - Filling the void

Installing foam void forms
Building wooden concrete forms

This week, crews continue to build wooden forms and pour concrete for the future facility’s foundation. As part of the work, large foam blocks are being used to fill in space in the foundation of one of the new buildings.

Fun fact of the week: What are those large foam blocks actually doing? Those blocks, called “void forms” will help to keep the foundation of the building stable and protected from soil movement without adding much weight to the building. Reducing weight where possible is an important engineering design in areas with the type of soil found on our construction site. After the forms are placed, concrete will be poured to seal them in. This is just one more technique being used by our team to build a solid foundation.

What's happening this week?

  • Building forms for concrete
  • Pouring concrete for foundation
  • Installing foam void forms
  • Backfilling excavated areas

What's happening next week?

  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Aug. 8, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

8/19/16 - Preparing to build walls

This week, crews began building forms for foundation walls and continued building forms and pouring concrete for the foundation floor.

Fun fact of the week: Concrete for the future facility foundation is built in a checkerboard pattern, with the foundation floor broken up in to small square sections that are poured one at a time. Pouring in this sequence allows the squares of concrete to shrink a bit as they set without affecting other squares. After the squares dry and shrink, areas between are filled with more concrete and joints are installed. This method of pouring concrete helps create a watertight foundation.

What's happening this week?

  • Building forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Pouring concrete for foundation floor
  • Installing underground pipes
  • Crews will work Saturday, August 20

What's happening next week?

  • Pour concrete for foundation walls
  • Continue to build forms for foundation floor and walls
  • Continue to install underground pipes
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation floor
  • Join us for community drop-in hours on Monday, Aug. 22, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

7/28/16 - Installing pipe and pouring concrete

Pouring concrete
Installed pipe

This week, crews installed reinforcing steel as part of continued pipe installation and foundation work. Some pipes on site are encased in concrete and steel for stability and so they can become part of the facility foundation. You can see the forms for the pipes in the second photo below.

Fun fact of the week: There have been a lot of concrete mixer trucks coming onto our site! Concrete mixer trucks mix the concrete as they drive in rotating tanks. Water and dry concrete mix are poured into the truck and churned by blades to mix the concrete and prevent it from hardening on the journey to the construction site.

What’s happening this week?

  • Pouring concrete for foundation and walls
  • Installing and testing pipes
  • Removing concrete forms that are no longer needed
  • Backfilling excavated areas

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Continue to install and test pipes

7/21/16 - Continuing foundation work

Installing pipe
Vibrating concrete

This week, crews continued pouring concrete, building foundation forms, and installing pipe. Foundation forms include wood frames to keep the concrete in place once poured and reinforcing steel bars (rebar) to add strength.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that vibrating concrete immediately after pouring helps remove air bubbles? A vibrating machine is inserted into the concrete when it is still liquid. The vibrations help pop air bubbles and solidify the concrete. Removing air bubbles makes the concrete more stable when it dries.

What's happening this week?

  • Pouring concrete for foundation and walls
  • Installing and testing pipes
  • Removing concrete forms that are no longer needed
  • Crews will work Saturday, July 23

What's happening next week?

  • Backfill excavated areas
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Continue to install and test pipes
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, July 25, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

7/14/16 - First pipes installed on site

This week we continued pouring concrete for the facility foundation and installing underground pipes. The pipes will be tested with water in the coming weeks to identify potential leaks.

Whidbey Island transitions from sea to land this weekend as Race Week winds down and the Ragnar Relay Northwest Passage race begins tomorrow. The relay race begins its Whidbey Island portion at Deception Pass and extends south through Oak Harbor to Langley. Clean Water Facility construction will not affect the route.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that concrete and cement are two different materials? Cement is a binding material, similar to paste, and is actually an ingredient in concrete. Other concrete ingredients include water, small rocks, and sand. An easy way to remember the difference between the two materials is that concrete makes building blocks and cement is the glue that keeps the blocks together.

What’s happening this week?

Forms for concrete pours
  • Building forms for concrete pours
  • Pouring concrete for foundation and walls
  • Backfilling excavated areas to create a level foundation floor
  • Installing and testing pipes

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to build forms for concrete pours
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Continue to backfill
  • Continue to install and test pipes

7/7/16 - July races in; micropile testing complete

Final micropile installation
First concrete pour for facility foundation

This week, we finished testing micropiles for safety and continued to build forms and pour concrete for the facility foundation.

Race Week begins this Sunday! The route and festivities will not be effected by facility construction. Good luck to all those participating.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that we conduct safety tests on parts of the future facility as we build them? The method we use for micropiles is called proof testing, which we perform on a representative sample. We apply a much greater weight than the micropile will experience once the facility is built to test strength. This way, we ensure the future facility meets the highest safety standards.

What’s happening this week?

  • Completing final micropile tests
  • Building forms for concrete pours
  • Pouring concrete for foundation and walls
  • Excavating in a new section of the work area to make room for future equipment, including pipes that will be installed under the concrete foundation
  • Removing part of existing facility infrastructure

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to build forms for concrete pours
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Continue to excavate
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, July 11, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

7/1/16 - Have a great Fourth of July!

Final micropile installation
First concrete pour for facility foundation

This week our team continued to build the future facility’s foundation. We will continue to build metal framework and pour concrete over the coming weeks.

Fourth of July at Windjammer Park continues as usual this weekend. Construction will not effect the family-friendly event, and no work will occur over the weekend, including Monday, July 4.

Fun fact of the week: The people have spoken! Oak Harbor’s Fourth of July festival in Windjammer Park was voted as one of the top 10 in the nation in a USA Today poll. Have fun and please celebrate our nation safely this weekend.

What’s happening this week?

  • Finished testing micropiles that support the future facility
  • Building concrete forms
  • Pouring concrete for foundation

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to build framework for concrete pours
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation

6/24/16 - Micropile installation complete! Foundation concrete pours starting this week

Final micropile installation
First concrete pour for facility foundation

This week our team reached two major milestones: we finished micropile installation and poured the first concrete for the foundation! All the work completed to date has gotten us ready to build a solid foundation. Here’s a recap of where we’ve been and what’s next:

  1. Complete: Drill stone columns; 168 stone columns stabilize the work area
  2. Complete: Install sheet pile walls; 176 sheet piles create safe work area conditions and further stabilize the soil
  3. Complete: Excavate the work area; we excavated about two stories down for the foundation of future buildings
  4. Complete today: Install micropiles; we installed 304 micropiles on site for earthquake and flood protection (for more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 construction below)
  5. Started this week: Pour concrete on the excavated floor and walls

Fun fact of the week: Cement is an important ingredient in the concrete we’re pouring this week. Modern cement is called Portland cement and was invented by Joseph Aspdin in 1824 when he burned a mixture of ground chalk and clay in a kiln.

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing final micropiles
  • Testing micropiles
  • Removing framework from tower crane base
  • Building framework for concrete pours
  • Pouring concrete for foundation

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue micropile testing
  • Continue to pour concrete for foundation
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, June 27, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

6/17/16 - First concrete pour for foundation next week

Wooden forms for concrete pour
Installing micropiles

This week, crews built the form for the first foundation pour! Crews also continued to excavate part of the project area. Crews have excavated to a depth of around two stories, which is as deep as excavation will go. Micropile installation continues and is expected to be complete by the end of the month. For more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 construction update below.

Fun fact of the week: The Kraken (krah-ken) is a huge sea monster of Scandinavian legend. Kraken were believed to look like large octopi, such as the one Oak Harbor High School Art Club members painted on our stormwater treatment tank. Legends described kraken attacking large sea vessels, as seen in the statue at the intersection of SE Pioneer Way and SE City Beach St. Kraken have been featured in myths of yore and more modern stories, such as 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

What’s happening this week?

  • Removing forms from tower crane base
  • Finishing excavation
  • Continuing micropile installation
  • Crews will work Saturday, June 18 during normal work hours

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue micropile installation
  • Receive deliveries of rebar
  • Begin testing micropiles
  • Pour concrete for foundation

6/10/16 - Tower crane base taking shape

Artwork by Oak Harbor High School Art Club comleted
Forming retaining walls around tower crane base
Oak Harbor High School Art Club member paints stormwater treatment tank

This week, crews formed retaining walls and poured concrete for the tower crane base. These walls will contain the concrete until it sets and the base can stand alone. Crews have also continued to install micropiles. For more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 updated below.

Fun fact of the week: The fantastic artwork on the stormwater treatment tanks by the Oak Harbor High School Art Club features salmon and an octopus. The Giant Pacific octopus typically weighs between 100 and 150 pounds and can change colors. Its default color is a rusty red, reflected in the Art Club’s work. The artwork will be complete by the weekend – see the picture below and stop by SE City Beach St. to check it out in person!

What’s happening this week?

  • Pouring tower crane base
  • Finishing artwork on stormwater treatment tanks by Oak Harbor High School Art Club
  • Excavating part of the project area
  • Continuing micropile installation
  • Crews will work Saturday, June 11 during normal work hours

What’s happening next week?

  • Remove forms for tower crane base
  • Continue micropile installation
  • Continue excavating part of the project area
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, June 13, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

6/2/16 - 120 micropiles installed so far – 40 percent complete!

Forming retaining walls around tower crane base
Artwork by Oak Harbor High School Art Club in progress

Micropile installation continued this week, with a total of 120 out of 304 micropiles completed. Crews also continued to work on forming retaining walls for the tower crane base. For more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 construction update below.

Fun fact of the week: The retaining walls being built for the tower crane work with the concrete slab under the crane to help counterbalance the weight it lifts. Our tower crane can lift up to 18 tons of materials or equipment!

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing micropile installation
  • Continuing to build retaining walls for tower crane base
  • Painting artwork on stormwater treatment tanks by Oak Harbor High School Art Club
  • Crews will work Saturday, June 4 during normal work hours

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue micropile installation
  • Continue building retaining walls for tower crane
  • Excavate part of the work area
  • Complete artwork on stormwater treatment tanks by Oak Harbor High School Art Club

5/26/16 - Clean Water Facility’s 50th construction update; Tower crane comes to town

Safey course at Public Works Family Fun Day
Tower crane on site

We have big construction news this week that you cannot miss (as in, 165-foot-big news) – the tower crane was installed! The crane will be used to move equipment around the site and help construct the new facility. This week, crews are also continuing to install micropiles. You can expect increased vibration and noise during micropile installation. For more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 construction update below.

Thank you!
Thank you to everyone who participated in Family Fun Day on Saturday! The rain couldn’t keep Oak Harbor families from celebrating the present and future of public works in our city.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that the average annual temperature in Oak Harbor is around 50 degrees Fahrenheit? Did you know that the Windmill in Windjammer Park is over 50 feet tall? Did you know Whidbey Island is just over 50 miles long? Did you know this is our 50th construction update for the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility? Thank you to everyone on our email list, we’re looking forward to continuing to share our project updates with you!

What’s happening this week?

  • Continue micropile installation
  • Installing 165-foot tall tower crane
  • Building retaining walls for tower crane

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue micropile installation
  • Continue installing 165-foot tall tower crane
  • No work on Monday, May 30 to observe Memorial Day

5/19/16 - We hope to see you this Saturday at Family Fun Day!

Constructing foundation tower crane foundation
Art installation by Oak Harbor High School Art Club

Celebrate the present and future of public works in Oak Harbor this Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by Windjammer Park any time to enjoy activities for all ages. More information is available on the participate page.

In construction news this week, micropile installation began this week as the next step in foundation work. We will install approximately 300 micropiles over the course of the work. You can expect increased vibration and noise during micropile installation. For more information on micropiles, check out the 5/12/16 construction update on our website.

Thanks to the Oak Harbor High School Art Club, the stormwater treatment tanks near SE City Beach St. look fantastic! The club will continue painting over the next few weeks. See below to check out their great work so far.

Fun fact of the week: This Saturday, you’ll be able to see construction and Public Works trucks up close, including a fork lift and a recycling truck! Some trucks will be in action and some will be available as photo booths. Want to join in the fun? Stop by Windjammer Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

What’s happening this week?

  • Beginning micropile installation
  • Building form and pouring concrete for tower crane foundation
  • Painting stormwater treatment tanks
  • Oak Harbor Public Works Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park, Saturday, May 21, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue micropile installation
  • Remove old power poles from City Beach Street, no power will be affected and there will be no traffic impacts
  • Install 165-foot tall tower crane
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, May 23, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

5/12/16 - Local art coming to our construction site!

Building tower crane foundation
Stormwater treatment tank before painting

This week, the east side of our construction site is getting more colorful. The Oak Harbor High School Art Club is painting designs on the stormwater treatment tanks that sit near the fence on SE City Beach St. We’re excited to see our local students’ work! These tanks collect and treat rain and other stormwater coming off the site. This process makes the water safe to reenter the environment.

In other construction news, we’re beginning micropile installation next week. Micropiles are thin, vertical elements that help stabilize the foundation. To install micropiles, a casing, which looks like a hollow pipe ranging from 3 – 10 inches in diameter, is driven into the ground using vibrations. A steel bar is inserted into the casing and cement grout is pumped into the casing, surrounding the steel bar. Increased vibration and noise can be expected.

You’re invited! Family Fun Day – Saturday, May 21 in Windjammer Park

The Oak Harbor Public Works Department is hosting a Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park on Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by the event any time to enjoy activities for all ages, and celebrate the present and future of public works in Oak Harbor. More information is available on our website www.oakharborcleanwater.org.

Fun fact of the week: The two most expensive paintings in the world, Nafea Faa Ipoipo by Paul Gauguin and Interchange by Willem de Kooning, were sold for $300 million each. We know that our local students’ baker tank art will be even more valuable – it’s priceless!

What’s happening this week?

  • Building form and pouring concrete for tower crane foundation
  • Excavating foundation work area
  • Painting baker tanks

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin micropile installation
  • Continue tower crane foundation work
  • Continue facility foundation work
  • Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park, Saturday, May 21, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

5/5/16 - Work begins on temporary foundation for 165-foot crane

Excavating foundation work area
Welding part of the tower crane foundation

Crews have begun building a temporary foundation that will support the 165-foot-tall tower crane that will be arriving on site later this month. Foundation work continued and crews completed the installation of the test micropiles. You can learn more about micropiles in the 4/14/16 construction update below.

You’re invited! Family Fun Day – Saturday, May 21 in Windjammer Park

The Oak Harbor Public Works Department is excited to announce Family Fun Day in Windjammer Park on Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Stop by the event any time to learn more about the Public Works Department and enjoy family friendly activities. Look for more information coming soon on our website www.oakharborcleanwater.org.

Fun fact of the week: Construction-themed toys have been parents’ and kids’ favorites for hundreds of years – Plato even wrote that future architects should play with building blocks as children. Building block sets and construction trucks remain popular with kids today. We’re excited to show off our construction and Public Works trucks at Family Fun Day on May 21!

What’s happening this week?

  • Building frame for tower crane foundation
  • Excavating foundation work area
  • Installing tiebacks as part of foundation work
  • Completing test micropile installation

What’s happening next week?

  • Pour concrete for tower crane foundation
  • Continue foundation work
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, May 9, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

4/28/16 - Foundation work continues and “rough terrain” crane arrives on site

Installing tiebacks

This week, foundation work continued with deep excavation and tieback installation. We anticipate completing the test micropile installation by the end of the week. For a description of the micropile installation, check out the 4/14/16 construction update below.

Fun fact of the week: How many cranes does it take to build a crane? Just one! This week, we mobilized a “rough terrain” crane that, in addition to having a cool rhyming name, will be used to build a 165 foot tall tower crane at the end of the month. The crane arrived just in time to celebrate Holland Days this weekend. Enjoy the festivities on Pioneer Way! There will be no construction activities this weekend.

What’s happening this week?

  • Excavating foundation work area
  • Installing micropiles and tiebacks as part of foundation work
  • Moving rough terrain crane on site

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue foundation work
  • Continue excavation

4/21/16 - Progress made on foundation work

Installing test micropiles
Installed tiebacks

This week, our crews finished installing tiebacks on the west wall of the project site and moved on to the south wall. We’re over halfway done installing tiebacks, with 139 installed! Facility foundation work continues with test micropile installation, described below in last week’s update.

Fun fact of the week: The Clean Water Facility Project is a prevailing wage project. This means that workers on the project earn the equivalent of the hourly wage paid, including benefits and overtime, in the largest city in the county. The Washington State Department of Labor & Industries establish the prevailing wage for each trade and occupation that works on public projects. Want to learn more about local contracting opportunities on the Clean Water Facility Project? Stop by the community drop-in hours on Monday, April 25 from 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way). All contractors are able to bid on portions of the project.

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing whalers and tiebacks as part of excavation work
  • Installing test micropiles
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 23, inside project area fencing
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, April 25, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way) – Local contractors are encouraged to stop by!

What’s happening next week?

  • Move temporary crane onto project site
  • Continue foundation work
  • Continue installation of test micropiles

4/14/16 - Micropile installation starts next week

Excavating on site
Bird's eye view of the site

Facility foundation work continues on the site. This week, we neared completion of tiebacks and whalers on the west wall. Now, we’re adding another technique to the mix: micropiles. Starting early next week, crews will install a few “test” micropiles.

Micropiles are thin, vertical elements that help stabilize the foundation. To install micropiles, a casing, which looks like a hollow pipe ranging from 3 – 10 inches in diameter, is driven into the ground using vibrations. A steel bar is inserted into the casing and cement grout is pumped into the casing, surrounding the steel bar. Increased vibration and noise can be expected.

Fun fact of the week: The Whidbey Island Marathon is this Saturday. Last year’s winner sped through the island with a race time of 02:55:44. Whether you’re lacing up your running shoes or cheering on the sidelines, facility construction won’t affect the race. Our crews are working Saturday inside the project area fence only. For more information on the route and temporary early morning race road closures check out their website www.whidbeyislandmarathon.com.

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing whalers and tiebacks as part of excavation work
  • Continuing utility relocation work on SE City Beach St.; please follow flaggers and signage when present
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 16, inside project area fencing

What’s happening next week?

  • Install “test” micropiles
  • Continue utility relocation work
  • Continue foundation work

4/7/16 - Tieback installation helps stabilize foundation work area

Excavating for facility foundation
Silo creating grout for tieback installation

This week, crews continued excavating the project site and stabilizing the area which will eventually be home to the facility’s foundation. Also this week, crews began installing whalers, which are horizontal beams that assist tiebacks in maintaining a stable work area. Tiebacks are installed diagonally into the sheet pile walls using grout, a fluid form of concrete.

Windjammer Park Integration Plan – give feedback online by April 8!

Couldn’t make it to the open house last week? You can comment on the draft plan for Windjammer Park online at www.oakharborwpip.publicmeeting.info. The online open house will be available until April 8.

Fun fact of the week: The ancient Romans were the first to use concrete when building foundations, using the material as early as 150 B.C. Although we use concrete in a similar way today, our machinery is a little more advanced.

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing whalers and tiebacks as part of excavation work
  • Continuing utility relocation work on SE City Beach St.; please follow flaggers and signage when present
  • Paving on SE City Beach St.
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 9
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, April 11, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue utility relocation work
  • Continue foundation work

3/31/16 – Excavation continues in the project area; two activities help stabilize soil

Excavating for facility foundation
Installing Tiebacks

This week, crews continued excavating the project site for the facility’s foundation. During this work, crews will install “tiebacks”, which are strong steel cables that help stabilize the walls of the excavated area. Tiebacks are drilled diagonally into the sheet pile walls, keeping the piles in place as soil is removed. Next week, “whalers”, which are horizontal beams, will be installed along the walls to further stabilize the area.

Windjammer Park Integration Plan – Give feedback online!

Couldn’t make it to the open house on Tuesday? You can comment on the draft plan for Windjammer Park online at oakharborwpip.publicmeeting.info. The online open house will be available until April 8.

Fun fact of the week: The Patronas Towers in Malaysia boast the world’s deepest foundation, which extends 374 feet into the soft rock below. Our foundation will have a final depth of 25 feet, not as deep as the Patronas Towers, but still interesting to watch!

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing tiebacks as part of excavation work
  • Continuing utility relocation work on SE City Beach St.; please follow flaggers and signage – as part of this work, Puget Sound Energy crews will be working and have trucks near the site Monday evening
  • Paving on SE City Beach St.
  • Crews will work Saturday, April 2

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue utility relocation work
  • Continue foundation work, including tieback and whaler installation

3/24/16 – Excavation underway as utility relocation continues

This week, crews began excavating the project site for the facility’s foundation. Utility relocation work is continuing on SE City Beach St. and is expected to be complete by late April. Two-way traffic will be maintained the majority of the time, please look for no parking signs and follow flaggers when present.

REMINDER – You’re invited! Windjammer Park Integration Plan – Tuesday, March 29

Relocating utilities in SE City Beach St
Excavating for facility foundation

The Windjammer Park Integration Plan continues to progress with community feedback, and it is time to see the latest designs. Join us to learn more and provide feedback on a draft plan. Community feedback will help finalize a park plan this spring.

Join the community advisory group and project staff on Tuesday, March 29, 5:30

  • 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St.) to:
  • Observe advisory group proceedings
  • View the draft Windjammer Park Integration Plan and share your thoughts

For more information, please visit the Windjammer Park page.

Fun fact of the week: Research shows that spending time in nature, including in parks, can boost your mood and reduce stress. You can help plan Windjammer Park’s future by participating in the Windjammer Park Integration Plan process in person on March 29.

What’s happening this week?

  • Excavating for facility foundation
  • Continuing utility relocation work on SE City Beach St.; please follow flaggers and signage when present

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue excavation for facility foundation
  • Continue utility relocation work
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, March 28, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

3/17/16 – Sheet pile installation is complete!

Installing the final sheet pile
Drilling to prepare for dewatering wells

This week, crews completed the sheet pile installation! This was a major step in stabilizing the project work area. Also, the effluent pipe that broke last week has been repaired. No service impacts occurred. Next week, team members will begin excavating for the facility’s foundation.

Windjammer Park Integration Plan – You’re invited! Tuesday, March 29

The Windjammer Park Integration Plan continues to progress with community feedback, and it is time to see the latest designs. Join us to learn more and provide feedback on a draft plan. Community feedback will help finalize a park plan this spring.

Join the community advisory group and project staff on Tuesday, March 29, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St.) to:

  • Observe advisory group proceedings
  • View the draft plan and share your thoughts

Can’t make it on the 29th? Starting March 30, you can give your feedback online at http://oakharborWPIP.publicmeeting.info. For more information, please visit the park page.

Fun fact of the week: Have fun at tonight’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, which starts at 4:30 p.m. on E Pioneer Way. The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade was held in New York in the 1760s, and the New York parade is currently the world’s largest.

What’s happening this week?

  • Finishing sheet pile installation on Monday, March 14
  • Mobilizing equipment for upcoming excavation work
  • Installing additional dewatering wells
  • Excavating on SE City Beach St. as part of the work to move electrical utilities underground; please follow flaggers and signage

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin excavation for facility foundation
  • Continue to move electrical utilities underground

3/10/16 – Excavation for utility work begins

Moving utilities on SE city Beach Street
Installing sheet piles

This week, crews continue to move electrical utilities underground on the west side of SE City Beach Street. Crews are excavating within the project area fence as part of this work. At this time, traffic along SE City Beach Street is not impacted.

The existing facility is being maintained as a pump station while construction of the new facility is under way. On Monday, an effluent pipe broke between two of the buildings at the existing facility. The City has installed a temporary solution and is monitoring the pump station 24-hours a day to ensure there are no impacts to the City’s system. Over the next week, the City will be installing a replacement pipe. The pipe, which was planned to be replaced later in the project, is being replaced now to maintain proper pump station function.

Fun fact of the week:Enjoying this windy weather? So did Ben Franklin over three centuries ago. On a stormy evening, Mr. Franklin ventured outside to complete his famous experiment with a key and a kite. The keys to our success in moving electric transmission lines on SE City Beach Street can be traced to Mr. Franklin’s experiments.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing sheet pile installation
  • Excavating part of SE City Beach Street (within the project area fence) as part of the work to move electrical utilities underground; there are no road closures at this time
  • Beginning repair on effluent pipe; there may be night work within the existing facility so work can be performed during low flows
  • Crews may work Saturday, March 12 and Sunday, March 13

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue sheet pile installation
  • Continue to move electrical utilities underground
  • Install additional dewatering wells
  • Mobilize equipment for upcoming excavation work
  • Complete repair on effluent pipe
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, March 14, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

3/3/16 – Moving utilities underground on SE City Beach Street

Spraying sheet piles to reduce friction

Two way traffic is active on SE City Beach Street; no road closures are anticipated during utility work. This week, crews began work on the west side of SE City Beach Street to move utilities underground.

Fun fact of the week: Things are heating up and cooling down on the work site! As sheet piles are installed next to each other, they create friction and can spark. Crews spray water on the piles during installation to reduce friction, cooling the sheet piles and preventing sparks.

What’s happening this week?

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue sheet pile installation
  • Continue utility work on SE City Beach Street

2/25/16 – Sheet pile installation begins

Sheet pile laydown area
Sheet pile installation

This week, crews completed the pre-drilling work needed for sheet pile installation. Large metal sheets continue to be delivered to the site this week, and sheet pile installation began on the western side of the project area. Increased noise and vibrations are expected as sheet pile installation continues. Click here to read a PDF with more information on this construction activity.

Fun fact of the week: Did you see the full moon this week? So did Oak Harbor Bay and shorelines throughout the region. Both high and low tides reach their extremes during new and full moons. These tides are called spring tides because they spring forth or rise. The project area’s beach location gave us a great vantage point to see the spring tides this week!

What’s happening this week?

  • Finishing pre-drilling for sheet pile installation
  • Receiving delivery of sheet pile panels
  • Beginning sheet pile installation on the west side of the project area; increased noise and vibrations are expected
  • Crews will work Saturday, Feb. 27

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue sheet pile installation

2/18/2016 – Pre-drilling continues; sheet pile installation scheduled to begin next week

Small glacial erratic rock in Smith Park
Pre-drilling for sheet pile installation

Crews have completed almost 60% of the pre-drilling work to prepare for sheet pile installation. A second vibratory hammer has been brought onto the site so crews can continue pre-drilling and begin sheet pile installation next week as scheduled.

Fun fact of the week: They aren’t strange or especially odd, but we do have some erratic rocks in our project area! Larger rocks, called glacial erratics, have been found around the project site. Geologists call these rocks “glacial erratics” because they were carried over a long distance by glaciers, differ in size and type of rock native to the area, and are often found in unusual locations such as the middle of a beach or field. These rocks can be found around Whidbey Island including some good examples at Smith Park.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing to pre-drill in preparation for sheet pile installation, which is planned to start next week
  • Receiving delivery of sheet pile panels

What’s happening next week?

  • Complete pre-drilling for sheet pile installation
  • Delivery of additional sheet pile panels
  • Start of sheet pile installation

2/11/16 – Pre-drilling continues to prepare for sheet pile installation

Demolition of portions of existing facility
Pre-drilling to prepare for sheet pile installation

Crews continued pre-drilling small holes in the project area to prepare for sheet pile installation. In addition to helping make sheet pile installation easier and more efficient, the small holes can act as guidelines for the sheet pile walls and help the sheets stand straight in the ground.

Clean Water Facility to continue without community room

On Wednesday, Feb. 10, the Oak Harbor City Council voted for the Clean Water Facility to move ahead without inclusion of a community room. The full video from the City Council Workshop is available on the Library page.

Fun fact of the week: The small holes created by pre-drilling look like gopher dirt piles. An average gopher in Washington State can move about 2,000 pounds of soil to the surface each year and can help increase soil quality. Much like our machinery, pocket gophers help prepare soil for better things to come.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing to pre-drill in preparation for sheet pile installation, which is planned to start the week of Feb. 22
  • Cleaning and painting dewatering tanks, which store groundwater removed to keep the work area safe
  • Finishing preparation of the laydown area for sheet pile materials and equipment
  • Finishing demolition of unused portions of existing treatment facility
  • Continuing to relocate utilities
  • Crews will work Saturday, Feb. 13, 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

What’s happening next week?


2/4/16 – Preparation for sheet pile installation underway

Demolition of anaerobic digester
Preparation of laydown area for sheet pile materials and equipment

This week, as part of the preparation for sheet pile work, crews started pre-drilling small holes in the ground. These small holes, which look a bit like gopher dirt piles, can help make sheet pile installation easier and more efficient.

TONIGHT! Windjammer Park Integration Plan

Join the community advisory group and project staff tonight, Feb. 4, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St.) to:

  • Observe advisory group proceedings (5:30 – 6:30 p.m.)
  • Talk to advisory group members and project staff (6:30 – 7:30 p.m.)
  • Share your thoughts on what should be included in the future of Windjammer Park

For more information, please visit Windjammer Park page.

Fun fact of the week: Anaerobic digestion is a big phrase for a process that works on a very small level! During anaerobic digestion, microorganisms break down biodegradable material. This method is used as part of the wastewater treatment system to reduce the amount of solid waste. This week, our crews demolished the existing facility’s digester, which is no longer in use.

What’s happening this week?

  • Pre-drilling to prepare for sheet pile installation beginning the week of Feb. 22
  • Continuing to prepare laydown area for sheet pile materials and equipment
  • Demolishing unused portions of the existing treatment facility

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue demolishing unused portions of the existing treatment facility
  • Continue pre-drilling for sheet pile installation
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, Feb. 8, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

1/28/16 – Stone column installation complete

Demolition of unused portions of existing facility
Preparing for laydown area

With the removal of equipment used for stone column installation this week, crews completed the first phase of foundation preparation work. Next, crews will begin preparing for sheet pile installation. Click here to learn more information on sheet pile installation and what to expect.

Windjammer Park Integration Plan – You’re invited! Thursday, Feb. 4

Join the community advisory group and project staff on Thursday, Feb. 4, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St. ) to:

  • Observe advisory group proceedings (5:30 – 6:30 p.m.)
  • Talk to advisory group members and project staff (6:30 – 7:30 p.m.)
  • Share your thoughts on what should be included in the future of Windjammer Park

For more information, please visit the Windjammer park page.

Fun fact of the week: Rome’s aqueducts were revolutionary in the ancient world. The first aqueduct, a water system that brought fresh water to Rome, was built in 312 B.C. Several are still in use today to transport water throughout southern Europe. The Roman aqueducts were the building blocks for many modern water and wastewater infrastructures.

What’s happening this week?

  • Completing stone column installation
  • Preparing laydown area for sheet pile materials and equipment
  • Demolishing four unused structures of the existing treatment facility

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue demolition of unused structures of the existing treatment facility
  • Delivery of materials and heavy equipment for sheet pile work

1/21/16 – Sanitary sewer pipe testing begins

Equipment removal to prepare for existing facility demolition
Stone column installation

This week, crews tested the new sanitary sewer pipe and continued stone column installation.

Windjammer Park Integration Plan – You’re invited! Thursday, Feb. 4

Siting the Clean Water Facility in Windjammer Park presents a unique opportunity to develop a long-term plan for the park. The City of Oak Harbor has formed a community advisory group to help develop this long-term plan.

Join the community advisory group and project staff on Thursday, Feb. 4, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St.) to:

  • Observe advisory group proceedings (5:30 – 6:30 p.m.)
  • Talk to advisory group members and project staff (6:30 – 7:30 p.m.)
  • Share your thoughts on what should be included in the future of Windjammer Park

For more information, please visit the Windjammer Park page.

Fun fact of the week: Early sewers were open and made of gutters and streambeds. Modern sanitary sewers only carry wastewater and are closed off or covered to prevent sewage leaking into the surrounding areas. Our sanitary sewer will help keep wastewater out of sight and contained for health and safety!

What’s happening this week?

  • Completing sewer pipe installation
  • Inspecting and testing new sanitary sewer pipe
  • Continuing stone column installation
  • Painting dewatering tanks (work is weather dependent)
  • Crews will work Saturday, Jan. 23

What’s happening next week?

  • Demolish two unused structures on the northwest corner of the existing treatment facility
  • Finish stone column installation and remove equipment
  • Community drop-in hours on Monday, Jan. 25, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

1/14/15 – Stone column work continues

Equipment removal to prepare for existing facility demolition
Stone column installation

This week, our crews continued to install stone columns and build the new 24-inch sanitary sewer pipe. Next week, the team is planning to remove an unused part of the existing wastewater treatment facility, located next to Windjammer Park, to make room for construction of the new facility.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know? All of Oak Harbor’s wastewater is treated at the Lagoon Facility on Seaplane Base. The existing Windjammer facility functions primarily as a pump station. The pump station keeps flows moving through the sewer system. The portions we’re demolishing are unused and won’t fumble your flush!

What’s happening this week?

  • Pouring concrete to encase the new 24-inch sanitary sewer line
  • Continuing stone column installation; Note: this work will pause for about one week
  • Crews will work Saturday, Jan. 16

What’s happening next week?

  • Inspect and test new sanitary sewer pipe
  • Continue stone column installation later in the week
  • Demolish two unused structures on the northwest corner of the existing treatment facility

1/7/16 – Happy New Year!

Materials for sanitary sewer utility relocation
Crane assembly for upcoming stone column installation

The Clean Water Facility construction team rang in 2016 by beginning underground stone column work. For more information on how stone column installation works and what to expect, check out our informational flier.

Interested in shaping Windjammer Park’s future?

The City of Oak Harbor is convening a group to help guide the future vision for Windjammer Park. The application deadline for the group has been extended to tomorrow, Jan. 8. For more information and to apply to join, please visit the Participate page.

Fun fact of the week: The first wastewater pipelines in the United States were made out of hollowed-out logs. Clay, iron, and pre-cast concrete followed as materials of choice for sewer pipes. The 24-inch sanitary sewer pipe we are installing as part of the project is made out of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), a type of plastic. PVC pipe became widely used in the 1970s.

What’s happening this week?

  • Beginning stone column installation
  • Removing mechanical equipment from of two unused structures on the northwest corner of the existing wastewater treatment plant
  • Continuing to relocate underground utilities, including installing a new 24-inch sanitary sewer pipe
  • Crews will work Saturday, Jan. 9, 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin demolition of two unused structures of the existing wastewater treatment plant
  • Continue stone column installation
  • Continue utility relocation, including installing the sanitary sewer pipe
  • Community drop-in hours Monday, Jan. 11, 2 – 4 p.m. at the Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way)

12/23/15 - End of the year activities

Materials for sanitary sewer utility relocation
Crane assembly for upcoming stone column installation

Our crews are gearing up for 2016 by getting started on underground stone column work. This week, materials and equipment, including cranes, arrived on the site. Stone column installation is expected to begin the first week in January. Click here to learn more about the upcoming work on the stone columns.

Please note this is the last construction update of 2015 – we’ll be back each week beginning Jan. 7. Happy New Year from the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility project team!

Interested in shaping Windjammer Park’s future?

The City of Oak Harbor is convening a group to help guide the future vision for Windjammer Park. The application deadline for the group has been extended to Jan. 8. For more information and to apply to join, please visit the Clean Water Facility project website.

Fun fact of the week: There are three types of columns in classic architecture: Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The stone columns our crews are building next week are much less aesthetically pleasing. This is just fine by us because the columns will be underground, stabilizing the soil for safer working conditions.

What’s happening this week?

  • Receiving equipment and materials deliveries for stone column work, including cranes
  • Continuing to install dewatering equipment, including holding tanks
  • Continuing to relocate underground utilities, including building a new 24-inch sanitary sewer pipe

What’s happening next week?

  • Delivery of materials for stone column installation
  • Continue utility relocation, including the sanitary sewer pipe

Holiday hours

Work will occur during normal work hours Dec. 21 – 24 and Dec. 28 – 31. No work will be performed on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1.


12/17/15 – Site prepares for the start of stone column work

Preparing equipment laydown area
Installing dewatering pipes

Before crews can build the foundation for the new Clean Water Facility, they need to prepare the underground work area to ensure safe working conditions. Due to the project site’s unique soil conditions, soil stabilization work will include a combination of building stone columns and driving metal sheets into the ground. Equipment and materials for the stone column work begin arriving on the site next week. For more information on the stone column work, click here.

Fun fact of the week: The equipment that will be used to drill and build the stone columns are heavy! To allow this heavy equipment to move around the site without sinking, small chunks of rock, recycled concrete, and gravel, called “rip rap,” has been put down around the site.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing to install dewatering equipment, including pumping wells and holding tanks
  • Continuing to relocate underground utilities in the north end of the work site
  • Continuing to install erosion control measures to protect the environment, including barriers, mats and gravel
  • Paving work on Southeast City Beach Street; there will be partial road closures at the street end of Southeast City Beach Street

What’s happening next week?

  • Equipment materials and delivery for stone column work
  • Continue installing dewatering equipment
  • Continue utility relocations

Holiday hours

Work will occur during normal work hours Dec. 21 – 24 and Dec. 28 – 31. No work will be performed on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1.


12/10/15 – Dewatering system set-up continues

60 percent design rendering with community room (SW corner)
Utility relocation

This week, crews continued work on the temporary dewatering system, which removes water from the site, helping to protect the environment and make sure underground working conditions are safe. This system includes pumping wells, generators, and pipes that move excess water to cleaning tanks before the water enters Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact of the week: Water covers 80 percent of the Earth’s surface. With water shaping such a large part of our lives, it’s especially important to keep it as clean as possible. Our crews use temporary dewatering and erosion control to prevent water contamination and pollution.

Interested in shaping Windjammer Park’s future?

Siting the Clean Water Facility in Windjammer Park presents a unique opportunity to develop a long-term plan for the park, integrating existing and new elements in this special community space. To move forward with this planning, the City of Oak Harbor is bringing together a group to help guide the future vision for Windjammer Park. The group will review information from previous park plans, provide input on the elements included and layout of the future park, and advise the city on community interests regarding the park. For more information and to apply to join the group, please visit the Clean Water Facility project website. Applications are due Dec. 11.

What’s happening this week?

  • Installing dewatering equipment, including pipes and pumping wells
  • Continuing to prepare equipment laydown areas
  • Continuing to relocate underground utilities in the north end of the work site
  • Continuing to install erosion control measures to protect the environment, including barriers, mats and gravel

What’s happening next week?

  • Delivery of eco blocks, which are large concrete blocks made of leftover, recycled, or unused concrete
  • Continue installing dewatering equipment
  • Continue utility relocations
  • Work in Southeast City Beach Street; there will be partial road closures at the street end of Southeast City Beach Street

Holiday hours

Work will occur during normal work hours Dec. 21 – 24 and Dec. 28 – 31. No work will be performed on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1.


12/3/15 - Laydown area preparation continues

Exposing underground utilities
Sun sets over the work site

This week, crews continued constructing an equipment laydown area and installed dewatering equipment. Construction teams use dewatering equipment to remove water from the soil for safer working conditions.

Fun fact of the week: Did you know that most of Oak Harbor’s utilities run underneath your feet? Electric and fiber optic wires and wastewater and natural gas pipes are just some of the utilities located underground. Crews must carefully locate and move the utilities in the project area so they can excavate and work without disrupting your service.

What’s happening this week?

  • Completing the on-site haul road
  • Continuing to prepare equipment laydown areas
  • Installing dewatering equipment
  • Continuing to relocate underground utilities in work area in front of the Whidbey Island Bank building
  • Continuing to install erosion control measures to protect the environment, including barriers, mats and gravel

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to relocate underground utilities
  • Continue to prepare equipment laydown area

11/24/15 - Happy Thanksgiving!

Prep work for the laydown area
Utility work in laydown area

Preparing sites for construction normally takes a few weeks and can include activities such as equipment and materials delivery, clearing and leveling the site, and relocating underground utilities. This week, crews continued to ready our site for facility construction.

Fun fact of the week: Dank je, gracias, merci! However you say thank you, the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility team wishes you a happy Thanksgiving this Thursday.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continuing to level and pave the on-site haul road and laydown area, which will be used for materials staging and storage
  • Completing clean-up of the western section of the project site
  • Installing additional erosion control measures to help keep water out of the site and protect the environment, including barriers, mats and gravel
  • Starting work to relocate underground utilities

What’s happening next week?

  • Complete the on-site haul road and laydown area
  • Continue installation of erosion control measures
  • Begin installing dewatering equipment, which removes water from the soil for better working conditions
  • Continue to relocate underground utilities

11/19/15 - Thank you for celebrating with us!

Groundbreaking ceremony
Crew working to build the haul road

This week, the City of Oak Harbor commemorated the beginning of facility construction with a groundbreaking ceremony on Tuesday. Amidst stormy weather conditions, crews continued to ready the site for construction of the new Clean Water Facility. Thank you to all who embraced the elements and joined in the celebration!

After the ceremony, the high levels of rainfall throughout the day overwhelmed the wastewater system, causing the city to issue an emergency stage 4 water restriction. The restriction was lifted yesterday. Thank you for your patience during the restriction.

Fun fact of the week: Oak Harbor’s existing wastewater treatment facility has a capacity of 4.7 million gallons per day. The future clean water facility will be able to treat 8.4 million gallons per day! The facility will also have improved back-up systems and technology that will help keep the system working during extreme weather events, like Tuesday’s storm.

What’s happening this week?

  • Paving the future haul road within the fenced work area
  • Beginning site preparation for stormwater tanks

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue utility relocation work within the fenced work area (work paused due to weather conditions)
  • Continue paving the haul road
  • Begin demolition in the northern RV lot
  • Build stormwater tanks

11/12/15 – Preparation for facility construction begins

Excavator arriving on site for upcoming facility construction
Crews starting utility relocation work

This week, crews finished restoring the outfall construction area and began preparing for facility construction.

Have you heard? Facility Groundbreaking Ceremony on Nov. 17

The Mayor Pro-Tem and other City officials will join project staff to celebrate the beginning of facility construction at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 17. Join us at the project site in Windjammer Park near the Wells Fargo Bank building.

Fun fact of the week: Many products labelled as “flushable” do not deteriorate like toilet paper. These items, like dental floss, hygiene products, facial tissues and baby wipes, can build up in the system and create backups and overflows. Instead of flushing these items, please throw them in the trash. You’ll help the whole system flow when you throw!

What’s happening this week?

  • Finishing clean up of the project area, including paving and landscape restoration
  • Continuing to prepare fenced work area for upcoming facility construction, including equipment delivery
  • Beginning utility relocation work with within the fenced work area

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue utility relocation within the fenced work area
  • Celebrate the beginning of facility construction at the project groundbreaking on Nov. 17 – join us!

11/5/15 – Outfall construction winding down, facility construction getting ready to wind up

Crews paving work area at south end of SE City Beach Street
Pavement, planting, and driftwood restoration

Work at the south end of Southeast City Beach Street is wrapping up as crews clean up and restore the outfall construction area.

You’re invited! Facility Groundbreaking Ceremony on Nov. 17

We are celebrating the beginning of facility construction at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 17 at the project site in Windjammer Park. Please join City officials, guests of honor, and staff in commemorating the official start of construction.

Fun fact of the week: Groundbreaking ceremonies marking the beginning of construction are traditional in many cultures. Original ceremonies often involved laying foundation stones and making offerings to ensure the buildings’ stability.

What’s happening this week?

  • Continued clean up of the project area
  • Paving work area at the south end of Southeast City Beach Street
  • Restoring landscaping in the work area, including plantings

What’s happening next week?

  • Prepare fenced work area for upcoming facility construction, including equipment delivery
  • Begin work on relocating utilities within the fenced work area

10/29/15 – Seawall restoration complete

Driftwood restoration on the beach
Restoration work at the south end of SE City Beach Street

This week, crews continued to complete the outfall construction phase of the project. As outfall construction winds down, the project team is preparing for facility construction. Stay tuned for more information over the next few weeks on a groundbreaking ceremony and upcoming construction activities.

Fun fact of the week: It was important for our crews to work around the tides during outfall construction and in-water work. The tidal cycle worked well with our outfall construction schedule this year. The lowest tides are in the summer, when we worked in the tidal flats, and the highest tides, called “king tides,” are in December. We’re “over the moon” for the low tides that let us complete outfall work!

What’s happening this week?

  • Replacing driftwood logs on the beach; logs were removed from the on-shore work area and stored prior to construction
  • Restoring the work area at the end of Southeast City Beach Street, including rebuilding the walking path – watch for cones and pedestrian wayfinding
  • Completing seawall restoration

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue restoration of the work area at the end of Southeast City Beach Street, including rebuilding the walking path
  • Restore landscaping in the work area, including plantings

10/22/15 – Outfall work in Oak Harbor Bay complete!

Section of the new seawall
Removing the barge from Oak Harbor Bay

Early this week, crews finished their work in Oak Harbor Bay, meeting our requirements for work within the approved “fish window” for habitat protection. Over the next few weeks crews will wrap up habitat and seawall restoration and complete the outfall construction phase of the project.

Fun fact of the week: A seawall is a wall built to protect a piece of land from erosion by the ocean or other water body. In our case, Oak Harbor’s seawall protects parts of Windjammer Park and the surrounding area. Humans have built seawalls for thousands of years – the first reference to a seawall was written in A.D. 439 in Constantinople!

What’s happening this week?

  • Removing the barges from Oak Harbor Bay
  • Continuing seawall and habitat restoration

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin preparing the site for restoration of the work area at the end of Southeast City Beach Street, including rebuilding the walking path
  • Replace driftwood logs on the beach; logs were removed from the on-shore work area and stored prior to construction
  • Continue seawall and habitat restoration

10/16/15 – Seawall restoration begins

Team restoring the seawall
Crews conducting habitat tests

This week, crews continued habitat restoration using “fish mix” in Oak Harbor Bay and began restoring the seawall that runs along the shoreline in Windjammer Park.

Fun fact of the week: How do we ensure our sea critters stay safe during construction? By hunting for eggs every week! Crews search for eggs from smelt (small fish that live in tidal flats) to make sure that construction activities are not affecting the smelt population.

What’s happening this week?

  • Starting restoration work on the seawall
  • Continuing beach and habitat restoration using “fish mix” (“fish mix” is a combination of old shells, pea gravel and sand that encourages surf smelt to spawn)
  • Continuing to remove materials and barges from Oak Harbor Bay

What’s happening next week?

  • Remove barges from Oak Harbor Bay
  • Replace driftwood logs on the beach; logs were removed from the on-shore work area and stored prior to construction
  • Continue beach, habitat and seawall restoration

10/8/15 – Construction barges starting to move out of Oak Harbor Bay

Workboat pulling materials barge
Habitat restoration work in the Bay

This week, crews began moving the barges holding outfall pipe construction materials out of Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact of the week: Our crews restore the beach habitat to attract surf smelt back to the area after construction. Surf smelt are small fish native to Puget Sound. They eat plankton (tiny organisms in the water) and spawn on mixed sand and gravel beaches. Seabirds and larger fish think surf smelt are a tasty snack.

What’s happening this week?

  • Removing large materials barge from the Bay
  • Continuing habitat restoration using “fish mix” (“fish mix” is a combination of old shells, pea gravel and sand that encourages surf smelt to spawn.)
  • Utility investigations at the intersection of SE Bayshore Drive and SE City Beach Street

What’s happening next week?

  • Remove equipment barge and small materials barge from the Bay
  • Replace driftwood logs on the beach; logs were removed from the on-shore work area and stored prior to construction
  • Continue habitat restoration
  • Begin seawall restoration

10/1/15 – Work on outfall pipe wrapping up over coming weeks

Excavator working in Oak Harbor Bay
Surveyors working at the site

General project update

At a City Council Special Workshop on Wednesday, City of Oak Harbor staff provided revised construction cost estimates for the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility. These lower cost estimates are based on the project recently meeting a “60 percent design milestone,” and set the stage for additional work to reduce costs over the coming months. The numbers constitute a best estimate of total construction cost, and do not include fees or costs for design, engineering, or potential amenity elements for the project. The team also presented information for upcoming City Council consideration related to technology and approach for biosolids, and if the new clean water facility will include a community room. Both will be formally considered by City Council on October 20. Video and presentation materials from the Sept. 30 workshop are currently being added to our website in the library.

Outfall construction update

This week, crews continued their work from the barge in Oak Harbor Bay by backfilling the trench around the outfall pipe. Work is expected Saturday, Oct. 3, during normal working hours.

Fun fact of the week: We might think the outfall pipe trench in Oak Harbor Bay is deep, but it’s quite shallow compared to the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Trench a naturally-occurring trench in the Pacific Ocean. It is about 1,580 miles long, with an average width of 43 miles and a maximum depth of more than six miles. It is the deepest part of the world’s oceans.

What happened this week?

  • Surveyed the alignment of the outfall pipe
  • Backfilled the trench around the outfall pipe
  • Continued restoration of tidal flat using “fish mix” (“Fish mix” is a combination of old shells, pea gravel and sand that encourages surf smelt - small fish native to the area - to spawn.)

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue habitat restoration of tidal flat using “fish mix” and began seawall restoration
  • Begin utility investigations at the intersection of SE Bayshore Drive and SE City Beach Street (please follow the direction of flaggers and signage to safely access your destination)

9/24/15 – City releases new, lower cost estimate; outfall work continues

Excavator submerges outfall pipe in Oak Harbor Bay
Dragon boaters pass the excavator and barge in Oak Harbor Bay

General project update

At a City Council Workshop yesterday, City of Oak Harbor staff provided revised construction cost estimates for the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility. These lower cost estimates are based on the project recently meeting a “60 percent design milestone,” and set the stage for additional conversations with City Council on how expected project costs can continue to be reduced. The numbers constitute a best estimate of total construction cost, and do not include fees or costs for design, engineering, or potential amenity elements for the project. Additional information on the cost estimate will be available on the project website after the presentation to City Council at the Sept. 30 meeting.

Outfall construction update

This week, crews have been working from the barge and under water to make sure the alignment and slope of the outfall pipe are just right before they move it into place.

Fun fact of the week: Happy fall! As of Oct. 14, 2014, the largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 2,096 pounds. The barge in Oak Harbor Bay could carry more than 38 of those pumpkins (81,000 pounds) if they were stacked on top of each other.

What’s happening this week?

  • Surveying the alignment of the outfall pipe
  • Moving and securing the outfall pipe into a shallow trench on the Bay floor
  • Backfilling part of the trench around the outfall pipe

What’s happening next week?

  • Continue to survey final alignment of outfall pipe
  • Backfill trench around the outfall pipe
  • Continue habitat and seawall restoration

9/17/15 - Outfall pipe submerged in Oak Harbor Bay

Evacuation of shallow trench for outfall pipe
Floating pipe and construction barge in Oak Harbor Bay

By the end of this week, crews will have floated additional sections of the outfall pipe into the water and submerged the 800 foot-long pipe. Once submerged, the pipe will be located near the shallow trench on the Bay floor. Next week, the pipe will be placed in the trench. Fun fact of the week: The Tour de Whidbey is this Saturday! Did you know the average road bicycle is a little over 5.5’ long? That means over 141 bicycles could line up wheel-to-wheel on the new outfall pipe (if the riders could hold their breath for a while!). If you are participating in the Tour this weekend, ride safely and have fun.

What happened this week?

  • Completed excavation of the shallow trench in the Bay for the outfall pipe
  • Floated additional sections of the fused pipe into the Bay
  • Submerged the outfall pipe into place near the trench

What’s happening next week?

  • Move and secure the submerged outfall pipe into the trench on the Bay floor
  • Continue habitat and seawall restoration

9/10/15 - Work continues in Oak Harbor Bay

In the Bay this week, crews worked from the construction barge to excavate a shallow trench and lay its gravel foundation. Once complete, the trench will hold the outfall pipe.

Fun fact of the week: [to the tune of Ghostbusters]
When there’s something strange
At the construction site
Who you gonna call?
The project hotline!

If you have any questions about construction or a concern about something you see at the site, call our 24-hour project hotline at 360-914-7000.

What happened this week?

  • Excavation in the Bay of a shallow trench for the outfall pipe
  • Continued fusing additional outfall pipe sections in the on-shore work area
  • Installation of fencing around the north lot of Staysail RV Park; the west lot remains open and the north lot is now closed (see updated construction map in email and attached)

What’s happening next week?

  • Complete shallow trench in the Bay for the outfall pipe
  • Float the fused outfall pipe into Oak Harbor Bay
  • Sink the outfall pipe into place

9/3/15 - Excavation begins in the Bay, habitat restoration continues

Outfall pipe installation in tidal flat and construction barge in Oak Harbor Bay
Staysail RV Park

In addition to surviving the windstorm, this week crews loaded an excavator onto the barge in Oak Harbor Bay. The excavator is working to make room for the outfall pipe on the Bay floor.

Fun fact of the week: Crews used “fish mix” (also called habitat mix) to begin habitat restoration in the tidal flat this week. No, “fish mix” isn’t a delicious breading used to coat fish sticks. “Fish mix” is a combination of old shells, pea gravel and sand that encourages surf smelt (small fish native to the area) to spawn. Other projects have used this mix throughout western Washington to help restore shorelines.

What happened this week?

  • Loaded excavator onto the construction barge in the Bay to prepare for installation of outfall pipe
  • Loaded materials, such as gravel, onto the construction barge
  • Continued restoration of tidal flat using “fish mix”
  • Restored most beach access in the outfall construction area – during high tide pedestrians will likely still need to detour around the site
  • Removed equipment support mats in the tidal flat, which helped to protect the flat during construction
  • Work is expected Saturday, Sept. 5 – work will be performed from the barge in the Bay and will not impact the marina or boat traffic.

What’s happening next week?

  • Excavation in the Bay for installation of the outfall pipe

8/27/15 – Restoration of tidal flat begins

Outfall pipe installation in tidal flat and construction barge in Oak Harbor Bay
Staysail RV Park

Fun fact of the week: the tidal flat in Oak Harbor Bay might look boring, but it’s overflowing with life! The flat is packed with tiny organisms that are too small for the human eye to see. These organisms support many species that we see every day, like shorebirds and oysters. The work performed in the tidal flat has been in compliance with all shoreline and ecology permits.

What happened this week?

  • Continued installation of outfall pipe in tidal flat
  • Brought additional materials into the Bay using a small barge
  • Loaded an excavator onto construction barge in Oak Harbor Bay; excavator will be used to install the fused pipe out into the Bay
  • Began restoration of tidal flat
  • Work is expected Saturday, Aug. 29 due to the need to conduct restoration in the tidal flat

What’s happening next week?

  • Removal of equipment support mats in the tidal flat; these mats have helped protect the flat during construction
  • Excavation for installation of the outfall pipe from the barge in the Bay
  • Continued fusing of the outfall pipe
  • Access to the beach in the outfall construction area will be restored by Labor Day Weekend

Staysail RV Park north lot closure starts Sept. 8. The north lot of Staysail RV Park will close (RV spots 32 – 56 and tent/overflow spots A – F) starting Sept. 8 to accommodate facility construction. The west lot will remain open.


8/20/15 – 400 feet into the bay; don’t forget to see our design concepts and give us feedback online!

Design open house Aug, 12
Outfall construction

Don’t forget! Our online open house continues this week: http://oakharborcleanwater.publicmeeting.info. You can see the current design concepts, and provide your feedback to help the treatment facility design. The online open house is available through Friday, August 21.

This week, the team installed over 100 feet of outfall pipe, with about 400 total feet installed. Next week, outfall work will begin to transition from the shore to the barge in Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact of the week: the highest tides in the U.S. are found in Anchorage, Alaska, with a 40 foot difference between high and low tide. Oak Harbor Bay’s tides aren’t as extreme, but outfall construction work is tidally dependent! Low tides are ideal for laying pipe from the shore, while high tides are great for work from the barge. In order to accommodate the low tide next week, the crew will be on-site starting at 6:30 a.m. Equipment is not expected to start up until 7 a.m. as usual.

What happened this week?

  • Continued excavating soil and installing the outfall pipe in the tidal flat

What’s happening next week?

  • Load the excavator onto barge in Oak Harbor Bay
  • Continue excavating soil and installing the outfall pipe in the tidal flat
  • Begin restoration of tidal flat

8/13/15 – Barge moves into Oak Harbor Bay; visit our open house online!

Outfall pipe installation in tidal flat and construction barge in Oak Harbor Bay

This week, our small construction barge, measuring about 50 feet by 60 feet, moved out into Oak Harbor Bay to help install the rest of the outfall pipe. This weekend, the barge will be anchored near the pipe in the Bay and will not interfere with the Hydroplane races.

Thank you to everyone who attended last night’s design open house! If you weren’t able to join us last night, we still want to hear from you. Visit oakharborcleanwater.publicmeeting.info to share your thoughts on facility design options.

What happened this week?

  • Continued assembling anchor blocks, which hold the pipe in place
  • Continued excavating soil and installing the outfall pipe in the tidal flat

What’s happening next week?

  • Begin excavating soil and installing the outfall pipe in Oak Harbor Bay; work will be performed from the barge
  • Continue assembling anchor blocks
  • Continue excavating soil and installing the outfall pipe in the tidal flat

8/6/15 – Small construction barge arrives in Oak Harbor Bay

Building the construction barge at the arena
Launching the barge from the marina

This week, a small barge, measuring about 50 feet by 60 feet, was launched into Oak Harbor Bay from the marina. The barge will help install the rest of the outfall pipe in Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact for the week:Our barge will carry an excavator weighing about 81,000 pounds. Harbor seals have an average weight of 245 pounds, which means our barge could carry about 330 seals. That’s a lot of seals!

Don’t forget! Next week join us for our design open house on Wednesday, August 12 at the Elks Lodge (155 NE Ernst St.) from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. You’ll hear the latest news on the project and be able to provide input on the current design. We hope to see you there!

What happened this week?

  • Completed site exploration work; the team has gathered the information they needed from the top layer of soil which will support cost verification and future construction techniques
  • Assembly of anchor blocks, which hold the pipe in place, continued
  • Arrival, assembly, and launch of barge from the Oak Harbor Marina
  • Excavation for and installation of the outfall pipe in the tidal flat continued

What’s happening next week?

  • Excavation for and installation of the outfall pipe in Oak Harbor Bay; work will be performed primarily from the barge. The barge will be moved during the Hydroplane Races the weekend of August 15 and will not interfere with the races
  • Community drop-in hours: Monday, August 10 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. at the project office (321 SE Pioneer Way)
  • Design open house: Wednesday, August 12 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at the Elks lodge (155 NE Ernst St.)

7/30/15 – Saturday work in tidal flat

Early site work
Outfall pipe work in the tidal flat

This week, crews began to install the first 700 feet of outfall pipe in the tidal flat of Oak Harbor Bay.

Fun fact for the week: The Blue Angels that flew over Oak Harbor yesterday are each 56 feet long. The portion of the outfall pipe that is currently being installed is about 12.5 Blue Angels long. Once complete, the outfall pipe will be about 25 Blue Angles long! Our outfall pipe may not be as cool as the Blue Angels, but the construction crew enjoyed the show.

What happened this week?

Outfall construction

  • Excavation and installation began on the first 700 feet of the outfall pipe; this work has to be completed during low tides using land-based equipment
  • Work is expected Saturday, August 1 due to the need to conduct work on the pipe during favorable low tides

Site exploration

  • Excavation continued in the parking lot and in the areas adjacent to the parking lot

What’s happening next week?

Outfall construction

  • Arrival and launch of barge at the Oak Harbor Marina; the barge will help complete work on the outfall pipe in the Oak Harbor Bay and will not affect the Hydroplane Races (Aug. 14-16)
  • Assembly of the barge in the marina parking lot; part of the marina parking lot will be blocked off during this work, the north side of the lot will remain open
  • Launch of the barge into the Bay; boat ramp is expected be closed for short periods on Tuesday, August 4 as we launch the barge, the north side of the ramp will remain open

Site exploration

  • Work will pause for several weeks as the team has gathered the information they needed from the top layer of soil
  • Maintenance of site, including dust control measures
  • Removal of equipment from the work area; fencing will remain

7/23/15 - Outfall pipe floated into Oak Harbor Bay

Heron, floating pipe, and beacon in Oak Harbor Bay
Crews working on ght floating pipe in Oak Harbor Bay

This week’s work included swimming as our team dove into the Bay to look at the underwater outfall pipe site. In addition, crews floated a section of the new pipe into the Bay. Race Week is in full swing and has been unaffected by construction. Please watch for the pipe, marked by buoys and beacons, to stay safe. If you missed the past few days of festivities, you can check out the fun on the Whidbey Island Race Week Facebook page.

What happened this week?

Outfall construction

  • Work on outfall pipe continued – additional segments were fused and 700 feet of pipe was floated out into the Bay; watch for buoys and beacons that mark the in-water pipe location
  • Installation of anchor blocks; these large blocks keep the pipe in place while floating in the Bay before construction, and will hold it in place once installed

Site exploration

  • Excavation of the parking lot continued; crews excavated the top layer of soil, about five feet, to confirm conditions

What’s happening next week?

Outfall construction

  • Excavation and installation of the first 700 feet of the outfall pipe; work will be completed during low tides using land-based equipment
  • Early morning and Saturday work is expected – due to the need to conduct work during favorable low tides work may start as early as 6:00 a.m. and work is planned for Saturday, August 1

Site exploration

  • Excavation will continue in the parking lot and begin in areas adjacent to the parking lot

7/17/15 – Work moving on to the beach

Pipe placement on the beach
Asphalt milling

As of this week, crews are moving to a small section of the Oak Harbor Bay beach and tide flats. This will include laying outfall pipe, held in place by large anchor blocks. The pipe is marked in the Bay with a buoy and a beacon – and should not affect boat traffic or Race Week activities.

What happened this week?

Outfall construction

  • Work moved onto the beach; the small area of beach in front of the worksite will be closed during this work – please use the marked pedestrian path around the site
  • Excavation for pipe to connect the air release structure
  • Continued work on the air release structure, including forming and pouring concrete
  • Continued work around the seawall

Site exploration

  • Completion of asphalt breaking and top soil removal to prepare for shallow excavation
  • Asphalt milling and stockpiling on-site; by milling asphalt from large to small pieces, this material can be re-used
  • Shallow excavation work started

What’s happening next week?

Outfall construction

  • Work will move into the tidal flats, an area in the Bay beyond the beach
  • Installation of anchor blocks; the anchor blocks keep the pipe in place while floating in the Bay before construction, and hold it in place once installed
  • Pipe assembly begins in earnest; portions of pipe will begin to be floated out into the Bay – pipe segments will be marked with buoys and beacons, there should be no impacts to Whidbey Island Race Week activities, please watch for the buoys and beacons to stay safe!

Site exploration

  • Shallow excavation work continues in the parking lot and area next to the current facility

7/9/2015 – Early site exploration gets underway

Early site exploration began this week as outfall construction continued. During this early work, crews will remove the top layer of soil (approximately five feet deep) in the area surrounding the new facility location (see map). The soil will be examined to confirm soil conditions and help verify construction costs. This site exploration is an important part of continuing design work on the facility.

What happened this week?

Outfall construction

  • Work on the air release structure continued, including excavation and equipment installation
  • Work around the seawall continued
  • Assembly of the outfall pipe began; crews will fuse pipe in 50-foot segments over the next couple of weeks, then will connect the full-length of the pipe
  • Installation of project signage around the work site

Site exploration

  • Delivery and installation of site fencing and excavation equipment
  • Removal of small shrubs, plantings, curbs, and light poles in the Whidbey Island Bank building parking lot
  • Removal of small trees along SE City Beach Street; trees will be replaced following completion of facility construction in 2018 (location and type may vary)
  • Installation of temporary pedestrian crosswalks and parking
  • Installation of project signage around the work site

What’s happening next week?

Drop by for cookies with the contractor at our next community drop-in Monday, July 13 from 2 – 4 at the old Whidbey Island Bank Building (321 SE Pioneer Way).

Outfall construction

  • Temporary beach closure within the work area – please use the pedestrian path around the site
  • Work will continue on air relief structure
  • Restoration work on the seawall will continue
  • Pipe assembly will continue

Site exploration

  • Completion of the temporary haul road north of the RV Park
  • Installation of erosion control measures
  • Start of asphalt breaking and removal
  • Shallow excavation work begins

7/2/15 - Happy 4th of July weekend! Windjammer Park is open!

See you at Windjammer Park this weekend for Oak Harbor’s 2015 4th OH July carnival and celebration! The park is open – remember to stay safe around the project’s construction areas: stay outside of fenced off areas, look for no parking signs, and follow the pedestrian path detour around the outfall construction area. Equipment and fencing will remain on site, no work will be performed July 4 – 6.

What happened this week?

  • Continued shallow excavation work within the fenced area of SE City Beach Street.
  • Startup of air relief structure installation. This structure, which includes pipes, a valve, and a 72-inch manhole, will help to release unwanted air from the pipe and keep flows moving smoothly.
  • Installation of temporary soil stabilization systems (see photo), also called shoring boxes, to hold back soil and create save underground working conditions during construction of the air relief structure.

What's happening next week?

  • Minor restoration work of the seawall; you will see a few concrete trucks on site.
  • Continued installation of air relief structure.
  • Early site exploration work prep! You will start to see: fencing delivery, and possibly some activity in nearby parking lots, and crews on-site. Exploring site and soil conditions will help us support design work and confirm treatment facility costs. Look for more details next week.

6/25/15 – breaking ground! Outfall construction is underway.

Crews broke ground on City Beach Drive this Monday – outfall construction has officially begun!

What else happened this week?

  • Crews began breaking up and removing asphalt to access outfall pipes
  • Equipment and additional pipes were delivered to the site
  • Shallow excavation of the fenced area got underway
  • Crews painted the sidewalk with handy footprints that show the pedestrian path around the outfall construction area (shown on map below). Stay safe and follow the detour around the work site.

What’s happening next week?

  • More deliveries! Equipment and materials will continue to arrive on site
  • Asphalt breaking and removal, along with excavation will continue
  • Equipment will remain on site, but no work will be performed July 4 – 6; 4th of July Carnival will continue as usual!

6/18/15 – 1,400 feet of pipe arrived today at the construction site!

What else happened this week?

  • Construction fencing and site preparation continued
  • Driftwood was safely moved from the project area to other locations along the shoreline
  • Temporary walking path installed for pedestrian detours around the site (see map)

What's happening next week?

  • More deliveries! Equipment and materials will continue to arrive on site
  • Work at the end of SE City Beach Street will begin, including breaking pavement and excavation work

Want more construction detail in person? You’re invited to our bi-weekly drop-in sessions!

Join us at our first “community drop-in hours”, this Monday, June 22 from 2:00-4:00 p.m. upstairs at the old Whidbey Island Bank building (321 SE Pioneer Way). This will be an opportunity to ask questions, talk to project staff, and hear the latest on construction.

We will be hosting these sessions bi-weekly. After June 22, we will continue on the 2nd and 4th Monday of each month from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Note: additional opportunities to discuss design of the facility will be announced later this summer.


6/12/15 - Outfall construction gets underway in June

Once treated water exits the new wastewater treatment facility, it will flow into Oak Harbor Bay through a pipe that is commonly called an outfall. The existing outfall has failed and must be replaced. Replacing the outfall is an important part of the City’s plan regardless of the site for the new facility, so it is being started now while the new facility’s design and construction planning continue to progress.

In early June, crews began site preparation for construction on the new outfall at the end of SE City Beach Street near the shoreline in Windjammer Park. Construction on the outfall is expected to be complete this fall, with wrap up activities continuing through the end of the year.

During construction, equipment and materials will be stored near the existing facility in Windjammer Park (see map below). The pedestrian path along the beach will remain open, a detour will run around the north side of the construction area. We encourage you to watch for signs and markings for safe passage.

What you can expect during outfall construction:

  • Installation of fencing around the work area (red area on map below)
  • Work hours typically 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. on weekdays, no weekend or night work is expected
  • Pedestrian detours around the site (shown on map below)
  • Restricted parking on City Beach Street
  • Equipment and materials staging north of the work site
  • Barges in the harbor
  • Work performed in the water
  • Weekly construction updates
  • Work will be limited or paused in anticipation of major park events (e.g., 4th of July, Race Week, and Hydroplane Races will continue as usual!)